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A NEW REFORM ASSOCIATION.

n THE SUICIDE OF VICTOR TOWNLEY.I

.A MILITARY SCANDAL.

MANCHESTER ART WORKMEN'S EXHIBITION.

AN EXECUTION IN JAPAN.

¡— A DREADFUL DEATH ON THE…

THE LATE CARDXNAL WISEMAN.

[No title]

[No title]

;1;., ~————. PRISONERS of…

- THE FEDERAL ARMY.

DARING ESCAPE OF A PRISONER.

I. \ A LAWYER'S PERSONAL LUGGAGE.

A FEW HINTS ABOUT COTTAGE…

CARDINAL WISEMAN'S SUCCESSORS

--DEATH OF FIELD.MARSHAL VISCOUNT…

-------.-EXTRAORDINARY CASE…

ROMANCE AND CRIME IN AMERICA.

ERUPTIONS OF ETNA AND VESUVIUS.

[No title]

[No title]

- APPLYING TO THE WRONG PERSON.

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APPLYING TO THE WRONG PERSON. There is a good deal of talk in military circles of a rather awkward affair in which the Chief Secretary for Ireland plays the principal part (writes the London correspondent of the Liverpool Albion). Some time ago, during a passage across the Channel in one of the Holyhead steamers, Sir Robert found himself in con- versation with a gentlemanly-looking man, who repre- sented himself as holding a commission in the army, and gave the name of S-. When landing, Mr. S- found himself in want of a little ready cash, having nothing but large notes about him, and he applied to Sir Robert, who lent him £ 3. 10s., which, of course, was to be repaid in a day or two. The money not reaching the right hon. lender, he made inquiry, and found there was a Mr. S- quartered at the Curragh, and presuming that he was the borrower, sent him a polite reminder of the obligation. Mr. S- at the Curragh, a gentleman of property who had not had the honour of meeting Sir Robert, and who had not borrowed 31. 10s. of him, thought that the whole thing was a joke, and treated it accordingly. But the matter soon reached the ears of the Com- mander at the Curragh, and of Sir G. Browne, the Commander of the Forces in Ireland, and the Mr. S.- who did not owe the money became exceedingly annoyed. Sir Robert had acted bona fide, but had made a mistake. Mr. S required an apology which, it is said, the right hon. bart. refused sogive. It is turther stated that Mr. S- was dis- posed to call Sir Robert out," and waited upon a Friend" with that object. The latter, however, pointed out to him what the possible consequences of such a proceeding might be. He reminded him that when the O'Donoghue sent him a challenge, Sir Robert named the Prime Minister his friend, and suggested that, if a message were sent in the present case, the right honourable gentleman might name the Com- mander of the Forces, in which event the consequences to Mr. S. need not be more particularly indicated. No one can suppose that in the first instance Sir Robert was guilty of more than just such a mistake as a gentleman of his temperament, and one so prone to rushing at hasty conclusions, might very easily [all into. But surely his dignity would not suffer by an apology to the gentleman whom he had erroneously supposed to be a defaulter in the amount of seventy shillings, borrowed money!

AN AMERICAN MURDE.

THE MARKETS.-