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A NEW REFORM ASSOCIATION.

n THE SUICIDE OF VICTOR TOWNLEY.I

.A MILITARY SCANDAL.

MANCHESTER ART WORKMEN'S EXHIBITION.

AN EXECUTION IN JAPAN.

¡— A DREADFUL DEATH ON THE…

THE LATE CARDXNAL WISEMAN.

[No title]

[No title]

;1;., ~————. PRISONERS of…

- THE FEDERAL ARMY.

DARING ESCAPE OF A PRISONER.

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DARING ESCAPE OF A PRISONER. A Sheffield paper gives the following account of the desperate escape of a prisoner by leaping from an express railway train:— On Saturday morning police-constable Walsh was proceeding by railway with six prisoners in his charge to Wakefield. Three of the prisoners had been com- mitted by the magistrates for different periods of im- prisonment, and the other three had been committed for trial at the ensuing sessions. One of the prisoners committed for trial was Thomas Anderson, an old offender, who was charged with stealing lead from the General Cemetery. The six prisoners, of whom Anderson was one, were all chained together by a convict chain," fastened to the wrists by means of handcuffs. As the train was passing through the Koyston tunnel, which is about a mile in length, Anderson took advantage of the dark- ness to break the chain, one of the links of which was, as he had quietly observed, defective. Immediately on the train emerging from the tunnel the atten- tion of the constable was drawn to the prisoner by the manner in which he was staring fixedly at him. Walsh bad just risen to his feet to move > towards Andersop, when the latter suddenly threw open the door, which he had taken the precaution to un- fasten while in the darkness of the tunnel, and leaped out of the carriage- ia moment the train was shooting down the incline at express speed, estimated I at from 40 to 50 niiles Per hour Taken aback by this j astonishing freak, vvaisn order to prevent the other 3 prisoners from slippfng their manacles off the chain, I attached his handcuffs to the end link, a precaution 1 which was, Per^aPs' 8?^fluouSi as none of the other 3 prieoners aP^a^ltof ^eany desire to imitate Ander- k son's original mode of taking his discharge. However, t by this arrangement WaJsh 8a d timef made h-g pri'_ j soners all safe foir delivery at Oakenshaw, 3 where he instantly locked them up in the pointsman's r box, theu' thr^offhu, .oats cap, and ran at full SPeepe1d d 0f the place where Anderson had s t8 Awived at that point he saw the spot where the pri- 3 soner had ahghted distinctly marked out in the snow and tracke<1 m by his footsteps ia the same tell-tale t covering of the ground. After crossing two or three ^rfsht of th"8 ^hlCh diuided them the constable f caught sight of the prisoner, who waa at that time about a Ta«. fd hvl"116 °ff- T was now rather dK rved thJ \0D £ P"r8Ult- Tfa°ugh the prisoner ° ffn recSn;a v- aWe ln PUr8Ult he seemed at f n0^ in Shi ? ^lm' M ue .Was ^.that time bareheaded ? v, 1 sleeves» but on, *"8 closer approach he S iftkf 4 y,0Ulh who was coming along the ) V?16' ^ho heard the shouts of the offi- 1 fotftii hlmself in front of the runaway, but failed erson intimidated him with threats 1 T~e Presen?e ?f the third person, how- SJlt th? ?ffect of delayinS the fugitive for a few r with him durin& that period Walsh almost came up 1 01 two after this, Anderson, seeing that 3 „ impossible, faced round, turned up his coat > Tore that he would not be taken, and dared the 1 t0 c°me on. Walsh, although breathless from ST."?8?,m,Ies chase over the snow at once accepted 1 Challenge. The prisoner parried the first blow, > from the second a poke in the* stomach rWVtaff he felL After this he was soon tamed, as Walsh was in no humour to stand any nonsense, and punished the man so severely as to reduce him to > a state of comparative helplessness. The prisoner, > who was bleeding freely, declared his complete sub- mission, and when Walsh secured him and was about to j take him to Oakenshaw he was in such a state of exhaustion as scarcely to be able to walk. When I Anderson rallied a little he gave as a reason for the j. course he had taken that he knew he should get from y seven to ten years if his case went to trial, and that he resolved to go to a place which shall be nameless J rather than go before the judge. He says that he at first was stunned by the fall. He thinks he laid for 'r ten minutes among the snow in the trench at the side of the railroad, and when he first attempted to rise he r felt like a drunken man. It is wonderful, considering j the express speed of the train at the moment of his escape, that he was not killed on the spot

I. \ A LAWYER'S PERSONAL LUGGAGE.

A FEW HINTS ABOUT COTTAGE…

CARDINAL WISEMAN'S SUCCESSORS

--DEATH OF FIELD.MARSHAL VISCOUNT…

-------.-EXTRAORDINARY CASE…

ROMANCE AND CRIME IN AMERICA.

ERUPTIONS OF ETNA AND VESUVIUS.

[No title]

[No title]

- APPLYING TO THE WRONG PERSON.

AN AMERICAN MURDE.

THE MARKETS.-