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A NEW REFORM ASSOCIATION.

n THE SUICIDE OF VICTOR TOWNLEY.I

.A MILITARY SCANDAL.

MANCHESTER ART WORKMEN'S EXHIBITION.

AN EXECUTION IN JAPAN.

¡— A DREADFUL DEATH ON THE…

THE LATE CARDXNAL WISEMAN.

[No title]

[No title]

;1;., ~————. PRISONERS of…

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;1; ————. PRISONERS of WAR in the SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY. We have been furnished (says the Manchester Examiner, with an interesting letter from a soldier named "Edwii Holmes, relating his adventures whilst a prisoner of war Ir the Southern Confederacy. The letter is addressed to hi. brother at Rolmflrth, Yorkshire, and is dated from Slacl County, Illinois. The following is an extraet:— %m once more at liberty to write to you, after mj longtm prisonmeiit in the Southern Confederacy and 11 the hands of the rebel chief. After I last wrote to yot from Kentucky, we got orders to march to Tennessee) and arrived at Athens on the 12th September. Twc .days after, having received further orders io march or to Cleveland, in KastTennessee, as look out," in com1 pany with the 1st East Tennessee, and the 8th MiobJgar Cavalry, (three companies being from our brigade), we started, and after marching all night, arrived ^t'.ou? destination, sleeping by the way, near to the C0^~K house, until dawn. Then we found ourselves about 25 miles from General Bragg's head-quartww> we remained at Cleveland about three days, receiving the utmost kindness from the authorities. On the day of our intended departure, we wert startled to hear that rebel forces were near at hand firing on our right, and about 5 o'clock in the morning we were despatched to bring in any rebel who might stray across our path. Our captain gave orders t( "double quick," and away we went over the fields, expecting a fight—and while so doing the rebels, whe came in great force down the roads, got m o our rear, cutting us off from the rest of our troops, our companj being the last in the field. As we wanted to join oui troops, there was no alternative but to cut our waj through the rebel lines but their forces coming upor us so suddenly, and in such overwhelming numbers this we found it impossible to do. By this time, YOt must know that we were receiving their shot and fir. on every side, but we replied to the ring m rapic succession, and marking our success by killing 15 0 the rebels, of the wounded, who were carried off th< field rapidly as they fell, I can form no idea as to th. number, but there were a great many. On our sid. was one killed and one wounded -that one being my self. Our captain was completely overpowered by I number of the rebels, to whom he was compelled t< surrender, after fighting bravely for about half an hour was the victim in the other case. Having been carried off the held I was attended b: some faithful Unionists of Cleveland, who dressel my wounds; the rest who were captured with m, being sent on to Richmond, Yirginiaj whence, afte having been confined two weeks, I was despatched t, Dalton, Georgia. Here I was kept in the hospital little more than a week, after which I was again trans ported, this time still further south, at last finding my self at Cassville, where I remained a prisoner til January this year. Whilst at Cassville I sufferei dreadfully from the wounds I received in the skirmis] with the rebel army, and was even worse than before the wounds having broken out afresh, after partial! healing—the ball just missing my knee joint, havinj entered in a very ticklish part of the leg. On the 25th January, my wounds being mucl better, I was again placed in the rebel cars, on the wa to Atlanta, Georgia. During this time I was not ii prison, but under guard, although I was compelled t walk with the aid of crutches; and I left Atlanta a tb« _eiu7i0^ February, when I was once more placed ii an cars> on my way to Dalton, in expectation c tn f«v«ge ^.Prisoners; but unfortunately I was nc o w n -edAm,that and was consequently i J In Atlanta again, where I remained unde guard r a month. At the expiration of that period by the a.d of the rebel "cars" I was transported t Campbumpter, Andersonville, Georgia. Theee wei my first steps en route for rrison life. About eigl o'clock, I arrived at these dismal gates, which in moment were open, and I was amongst 5,000 poor I Union soldierfi-and of all the sights I ever saw in all my life this crowned all. They were dirty, ragged, shoeless, and half-naked fellows; no blankets, no tents, and nothing but the cold sands to sleep upon; half starved to death the men were, and were not even provided with soap to wash themselves with. I never received such treatment as this before. The rebels ° 11 j 'j4 treating us as prisoners of war, but I called it treating us worse than criminals, but I had to share the same fate the rest of my fellow soldiers bad to submit to. We were, too, exposed to all kinds of weather, hot or cold, wet or dry, and in prison we remained till the 8th Sept., when they run us off to Charleston, South Carolina, for fear of our being recaptured by General Sherman, he being then on the roads approaching Atlanta. We were at Charleston two days, when we were forwarded to Camp Florence, 100 miles back into the country, where we were again placed in prison-a worse one even than the first. •S-Ur JaHona were one pint of corn meal per day, without Bait or anything else. This brought us very low in nesh. The bad treatment and starvation, having nothing but corn meal for food, caused our men to have the scurvy very bad, some suffering extremely from it, and when it worked its way inwardly it was certain death.. 1 have witnessed more since I was taken prisoner than I ever did before; and since last May, up to the 8th of last September, whilst I was prisoner at Andersonville, no fewer than 16,000 of our brave troops perished, solely by bad treatment and starvation received at the hands of the rebels. After a man has. gone through all this, who could up- hold such a government as the Southern Confederacy? But on the 27th of November I was paroled out with the sick and wounded, and three days after we were delivered into our own men's hands and I am once more under the glorious good old stars and stripes of a free country, and in the midst of an enlightened people. I am now with my family at home on furlough my wound better, but I am somewhat lame. Idont expect to do any more fighting, although I shall have to report to the army on the 16th of this month. These are all the details I can give you for the present.

- THE FEDERAL ARMY.

DARING ESCAPE OF A PRISONER.

I. \ A LAWYER'S PERSONAL LUGGAGE.

A FEW HINTS ABOUT COTTAGE…

CARDINAL WISEMAN'S SUCCESSORS

--DEATH OF FIELD.MARSHAL VISCOUNT…

-------.-EXTRAORDINARY CASE…

ROMANCE AND CRIME IN AMERICA.

ERUPTIONS OF ETNA AND VESUVIUS.

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- APPLYING TO THE WRONG PERSON.

AN AMERICAN MURDE.

THE MARKETS.-