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,MANGIN THROWS ASIDE HIS MODESTY.

^OTTING OUT THE HOBBIES.

THE ENGLISH IN FRANCE.

THE RAILWAY SYSTEM IN INDIA.

A PAINFUL CASE.

LATEST SCIENTIFIC NEWS.

THE SHIP ON FIRE !

ROMANTIC MOVEMENT IN CORK.

HOW MURDER IS TRACKED IN AUSTRALIA.

THE DWELLING-PLACES OF AGRICULTURAL…

THE PHILOSOPHY OF TRAINING.

A CURIOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC CASE.

MR. GRAVES NOT LIKING HIS…

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MR. GRAVES NOT LIKING HIS WIFE! In the Court of Probate and Divorce, a somewhat peculiar case (Graves v. Graves) has been heard; and was the petition of Dania Mary Graves for a dissolution of marriage on ac- count of her husband's adultery and desertion of her Her maiden name was Howlin, and on the 29th of May, 1860, she was married, at Dublin, to the respon- dent, John Bellew Graves, a gentleman of independent property. After the wedding the parties came to England and lived together till the 21st of August. At that time they were residing at Tenby and the petitioner said she went away because her husband had been constantly telling her that he wished her to return to her family. The night before the separation he had insulted her before her friends, and she thought that he had done it for the purpose of driving her away. Having a fortune of her own, she had paid all the expenses while she was with him. At the beginning of October she saw him at an hotel at Ferryside, a station on the South Western Railway, and asked him to allow her to remain with him. He told her that that could not be, and she returned to her old lodgings at Teaby, where she stayed for some little time. A number of letters passed, but no reconciliation was effected, and the petitioner at length returned to Ireland. Several other attempts were made, both by her and by her friends, to come to a better under- standing with him, but they all failed, the respondent flatly refusing to have her back. It must be added, that during the matrimonial cohabitation of nearly three months the respondent had never made any I attempt to complete his marriage. He had since left the country. The explanation of his strange conduct which he gave to a friend was that he had been years ago attached to Mias Howlin, that the engagement had been broken off, and that it was only the persuasion of his friends that had induced him, much against his will, to renew it. He had also written the following letter to his brother-in-law Landyfilog, October 15, 1860. To James Howlin. You wish me to state my reasons for having, or rather de- siring, that my wife should leave me, and that we should live separately. They are simply that I from my heart dis- like my wife, and this feeling existed before our marriage, but in a less exaggerated form. I believe her to be a good and virtuous woman, and to a man who loved her she would make a good and devoted wife. She has done all in her power to please me, but of no avail. I feel miserable in her society; consequently, she must feel equally so in mine, and I think it better we should, as many do, live separately. That, on the other hand, my wife knowing my feelings, can come to my house at Glenmorlais, if she chooses to live on the same terms we have always done since the day of our marriage. I will answer any letters James Howlin may think proper to address to me on this subject. J. B. G. A young woman named Williams, whom the re- spondent had seduced in 1856, and whom he had engaged as a servant after his marriage, deposed that she had borne children to him on the 17th May, 1860, and on the 23rd of May, 1863.. For the first he allowed her 5s. per week, and for the second 2s. 6d. After this a decree nisi, with costs, was granted.

NOBLE CHAFF.

THE FRmNCH PRESS AND THE QUEEN'S…

THE INVASION OF SCHLESWIG.

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--------------AMUSING ANECDOTES…

PIRACY THEN AND NOW!

LOVETAND SUICIDE!