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(Our Curmpmibtiit.j

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(Our Curmpmibtiit. j ;0 doom stT kh.t to state that we do not at all times indentiff 1 >uisclves wi & our correspondent's opinions. 1 In corf jixion with all who have read the announce- ment, ± have read with pain that her Majesty will not this >eiiSoiQ hwld any levees or drawing-rooms, but that they are to be held by the Prince and Prince-s of V^fejes. Of course we must believe the statement (ttJát any state ceremonMS would be prej odicial to her J'MajesVy's heaitb, and believing it, we regret it. This • vili, of course, throw a -damper ovar the London .-sciason; hut conudtrnW-XM of a higher ordezo wiJl. "fiX • Jie public mind fen«r»lly. It would now ia»ia iftha <|aee 11 never again intended to single t^aong her people; and it would be uBeleaa to der y that com- plaints. deep if not loud, are accord'j^iy very com- monly expressed. But there is n^/help for it. It is not for want of hints, more or Jess gentle, that the (lueen refrains from public Ceremonies. Her Majesty is known to have a determined will of her own, and as to presiding at levees and drawing-rooms, it is in this matter,^ a.s with others- Y she will, you may depend on't, And i- ^ije won't, she wont, and there's an end on't. All tbe.t is left for us, therefore, is to regret the deci- sion that her Majesty has arrived at, and hope for lighter times. We are once more" in session," aDd the clang of arms resounds—very figuratively speaking—through the fretted and gilded chambers of the Parliament Houses. The opening of the session, unfortunately, was wanting in that pomp and circumstance which it would have had had the Queen opened it in person. Lord Westbury is but a sorry substitute for her Majesty, but that is no fault of his. I do not intend to comment on the political position of the Ministry or their opponents, or to speculate on the prospects of the session; but I may be just allowed to remark that, whatever may be the attitude of Ministers, the Con- servatives, undoubtedly, show a bold front; so that, whatever else we may lose or gain, we shall no doubt have plenty of party battles. It is no doubt a great pity when any statesman "gives up to party what was meant for Mankind," but we, aa a nation, never- theless, owe much to the spirit of party. Fancy a vestry, a Board of Works, or any other local body of the sort, all of one side in parochial politics; why, our sewers, gas-pipes, and parish-engines would be neglected for the want of an opposition. So in the great business of legislation. Party spirit goads on the opposing side to works of public utility. We owe Habtaa Carpus, trial by jury, the Bill of Rights, the Reform Bill, and a hundred other measures to the spirit of party. But I am becoming politico- economico-philosephical, and will revert to the House of Commons, for I have not seen the Upper House this session. The House itself looks as it did. There is no internal or external alteration. And Lord Palmerston, too, looks as he did. I cannot Bee that he looks a bit older. Whether it was that he was de. lighted that he had received peaceful news from Vienna and Berlin, or whether he was (as no doubt he must have been) pleased that that detestable action in the Divorce Court was over, and that he came out with flying colours—or both,—certain it is, that on the opening afternoon he looked cheery and chatty, smiling and in good health, and when he spoke, it was aa clearly and distinctly aa ever. As to Mr. Gladstone, I fancy that his two million surplus must have had the same effect on him as the discovery of a good round balance after stock-taking has on a merchant or tradesman; for the Chancellor of the Exchequer certainly looks in better health than he did last session. The only member of the Government that looks worse than I remember him last session, Is Sir Georgt Grey, and I regret to say the Home Secretary does not look in good health. We must bear in mind that the Home Secretary, like the Foreign Secretary, has hard work during the recess, as well as during the session; and during the past recess Sir George Grey has had an especially hard time of it, and has had enough badgering (lean find no better word) to make any man look ill. Possibly, too, he looks forward to rather a trying time of it during the session which has com- menced. Whatever may be the politics of the readers of this letter, I venture to ray that all will rejoice at the termination of the O'Kane and Palmerston divorce case, and I hesitate not to express my conviction that there was never any ground for the action, and, in common with the public generally, I rej oiee that thesham trial has terminated m it has done-that the Judge- < )rdinary could declare that the noble co-respondent left the Court without a stan on his honour. The prevailing impression all along has been that it was a trumped-up charge-an attempt to extort money without any foundation for the action. It is said that the Premier intends prosecuting O'Kane for conspiracy. I do not put any faith in this rumour. I hear that O'Kane is now on his way to Australia. Be this as it may, I do not believe Lord Palmerston will stir any further in the matter. He knows that the country is with him on this subject at least, and after the decision of the Divorce Court he can afford to. treat the so-called petitioner" with contempt. This action shows that the Divorce Court affords the machinery, in the hands of an unscrupulous man, to torment any victim whom he may select. Any evil-minded man may at one blow ruin the character of his own wife, and inflict a lasting injury on his "friend." This, how- ever, is but a drawback to-an institution which, on the whole, works well, and we must put up with the evil for the sake of the more than counterbalancing good. Before this court was established there was a law for the rich, but none for the poor. A poor man might have ever such good grounds for divorce, but it was placed out of his reach by the enormous expense which a trial involved. The Dano-German war is a drajpoa which proceeds so rapidly that, before these lines are read, my im. pressions on the last news now (my now") may be completely neutralised; but at the moment I write the Danes must have abandoned all hope of victory over the Austro-Prussians on land, and unless Europe interferes, the war will soon be settled as Germany may. it to be. Meanwhile, there are rumours of frienijy Powers inducing the contending forces to in- stitute an armistice while the Rigsrad discusses terms ot peace. As so much interest is now felt in the news from Germany and Denmark, it may not be amiss to give my readers a hint that they should take Mr. Reuter's telegrams, relative to the rupture, with a grain of salt. I have watched Mr. Reuter's progress from the time he sent stray telegrams (which were pooh-poohed) during the Crimean war, and I have found him to be wonderfully correct; but we must bear in mind that this gentleman is a German Jew, and that he naturally sides with his own country. If at any time, therefore, he slightly colours any item of news, it is not to be surprised at. But especially is care necessary in swal- lowing bodily" Reuter's Express." The articles ap- pearing under this head are scarcely items of intelli- gence—they are rather opinions— and as they come from Mr. Reuter's German correspondents, they are iikely to be unduly in favour of Germany, Verbim sap.. Few of your readers perhaps, amid the exciting tnpiCB of the past year or two, remember an action that was brought by Serjeant Glover against the Count Persigny. The serjeant was at one time proprietor of the defunct Morning Chronicle, and he claimed money for having, according to agreement, supported the cause of the Emperor of the French thuough the medium of • ount Persigny. The action for a time fell through, pnd people forgot it; but we have not heard the last of it. A committee is at this moment; getting up evi- dence for the defence, and the trial will probably come < n in a month or two. The once powerful Chronicle oiag dead, less interest will attach to this case than under other circumstances but I should not be sur- prised to hear that there were good grounds for the action. The Chronicls once stood above any and every ether paper, the Times not excepted but in its latter Jays it fell very low. I well remember, some years l-ince, a sudden transition in the "once familiar face" 1 >f the Chronicle, which one fine morning came out like a French paper, with special French characteristics, and" laying it on thick" in praise of the Emperor Napoleon. Here began, doubtless, the services for winch -Serjeant Glover brought his action. I should i\i it, therefore, be much surprised if some curious reve- lations were even yet to transpire. Milton has left on record his opinion, written in im- perishable verse, that Shakspeare needs no monument. am happy to believe that he does not. I doubt whether, at all events, the so-called National Com- mittee or the Stratford Committee will give him any monument. Meddle and muddle" has been recently applied as a taunt by one statesman to another. It i;;ay be also applied by the public to both the London and the Stratford committees. What a complicated 1;[\:8S the former have made of it we all know; and I OW, it seems, the Stratford committee have exhibited ■ most equal powers of mischief by so insulting the iirst tragedian of the day (Mr. Phelps), that he will not play anything for anybody during the Stratford i-iskbration. In fact, the two committees put together ..rt, ail the hero of "Hard Times'" says, "aw a muddle," we go on much longer like th it will be desirable i< ;!ve everybody his money bac -< "J J bring down the .curtain. f undon is now getting into fuU wing. The Lon- ion season commences with the -:=)ion, and as the weather is fine and trade generally good, the metro- ■■■ ilis is quite brisk. The theatres are full every night to „ vt r flowing, and every place of public resort is similarly (•iiccesvful. The clubs in P ill MpJI once more look th. iii elves (though they never anything else), and Rotioa-row once again has its familiar figures in the shape of fair ladies doing the equestrian, fol- lowed by grooms on high-mettled blood horses, and occasionally escorted by some favoured admirer. Piccadilly, Belgravia, Regent-street, and the Parks are once more themselves again. The law courts offer their daily meal of costless excitement to lazy loungers the strangers' gallery once more is an object of frequently fruitless ambition, so speedily is it filled up. The West-end and the fashionable locali- ties generally, are once again brisk with nightly | parties and, in a word, London's itself again.

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

THE CASE OF MURDER AND PIRACY…

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An OLLA PODRIDA from NEW YORK.

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MARRYING A WARD IN CHANCERY.

"SUCH IS LIFE!"

HAVING A GOOD OPINION OF THEMSELVES!

THE MINOR STATES OF GERMANY…

:IACTION AGAINST MR. WINDHAM.

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