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The AWFUL CALAMITY at SANTIAGO…

FASHIONS FOR FEBRUARY.

THACKERAY'S LAST WORK.

[No title]

TIDDY PRATT.

--._---._-INTERESTING LETTER…

A STRANGE PROBATE CASE.

CAREER OF A WONDERFUL MAN.

——— RAILWAY COMPENSATIONS.…

UNEQUAL COMPENSATIONS.

A DRAMATIC READING IN PARIS.

-----'i MR. BRIGHT'S EXPERIENCE…

[No title]

THE FOOD FOR POWDER!

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THE FOOD FOR POWDER! The Prussian regiments are composed of healthy, sturdy-looking men, and excite general admiration (writes a correspondent). They are somewhat short, but seem to possess that weight and muscle for which English soldiers have become justly renowned. I think I have never seen troops in such blooming condition. Their arms, defensive and offensive, are remarkably good, but perhaps too cumbersome. The foot soldiers even have heavy helmets, which give them a martial appearance, but must be particularly oppres- sive and the whole Prussian army is provided with the famous needle-gun, the qualities of which will now probably be put to the test for the first time on a large scale. It has hitherto only been tried with skirmisher ■>, and found to be very effective, as it is loaded from behind, and six shots can be fired in a minute while the men are lying flat on the ground. It is an interest- ing but horrible experiment, which will be shortly made, to see what destruction will be caused by such an instrument in the hands of thousands of pretty good marksmen. The Austrian troops seem also thoroughly good soldiers, but in general look less stalwart than the Prussians. Their cavalry appears to be composed of remarkably, small men. Both the Prussian and Austrian officers are in remarkably good trim. When one looks at the physical superiority everywhere visible in all these German troops, it is difficult to account for their defeats by the French— except in the fact that there is a want of that da-hand fierceness which sparkle in the eye of almost every French soldier. For years, it is well known, there has been the greatest jealousy and antipathy between the Austrian and Prussian officers, and it is, therefore, amueing now to see them brought together as friends by the force of circumstances, and obliged to make a show of cordiality. I was present on one occasion when a party of Austrians and Prussians met, and could not help observing that their eager cordiality was forced. Whether the jealousy, which has existed for years, will, in spite of all efforts, lead to difficulty in the end, is a great question. Such a thing would give the Danes no slight advantage.

BLESSING A RIVER IN RUSSIA;

[No title]

ATTEMPTED FRAUD ON UNDERWRITERS.

LIFE IN NEW YORK.

I THE DOGS' HOME.

lltisoilmraras (lateral ftcte.