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DUELS OF GERMAN STUDENTS.

AN ARCHBISHOP LYING IN STATE.

BEEF, CHURCHES, ORGANS, ETC.,…

ADVENTURES of a FEDERAL RECRUIT.

A SKETCH IN SCOTLAND. !

SKETCHES FROM AFRICA.

FREEDOM BEFORE FOOD.

! NOT A BAD IDEA OF KING WILLIAM.

LITIGATION BETWIXT FATHER…

SKETCHES FROM SCHLESWIG.

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE at a.…

THE LAST OF THE LUTHERS!

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THE "ALABAMA" AGAIN!

A TOUCHING STORY. ---

CANDEL4BM FOR IIIS NIZAM.

WAR NEWS FROM NEW YORK.

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ADVICE TO FEDERAL AMERICA.

SCENE IN IA THEATRE.

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SCENE IN IA THEATRE. The fiirmii}(/ha"1 Gazette has an account of an ex- traordinary scene which was witnessed at the Adelphi Theatre in that town on Saturday night. It seems that during the pantomime the "supernu- meraries" struck work, and the Clown explained to the audience that none of them had been paid their wages.. At last it came to a scene in J which the Clown has to jump from a springing board through a trapdoor. The Clown went to the side wings, and appealing to some one there, with out- stretched hands, said, I cannot break my neck; there's no one on the other side." As may be sup- posed, the hisses, groans, whistling, and noises that ensued were almost deafening. After a time the manager came forward in front of the footlights, and entered into a statement to the effect that the great expenses of the pantomime did not allow him to pay all his debts. The Clown denied many of the manager's statements, and a discussion ensued betwixt them. At last the performance went on, the Clown, Panta- loonr;id Sprites doing their tricks as far as possible without the aid of supernumeraries. The only person belonging to that fraternity who appeared on the stage was a solitary man dressed up as a policeman, and one young gi;l, and they, in the orthodox style, were beaten and kissed by the Clown. Still the greatest confusion and noise reigned amongst the gods," and the respectable people in the stalls and pit had luarly all left t':e house. Sundry fights took place in the gallery, and pieces of the seats were thrown into the stalls. The Columbine, Clown, Pantaloon, and Sprites still appeared on the stage, and the ba.nd played music, not ajnote of wh ch could be heard. The li^h's were ultimately quelled by the two policemen stationed in the gallery, and the "goda" having tired themselves, a little order was restored. One of the Sprites then came forward, and saying, "This is for the rest of the company," went through a clever gym- nastic performance, which called forth hearty applause. Some one then shouted from the gallery to the Spri-.e "Got any money, Fred?"—Sprite "No." A Voice: "Got any money, Clown?"—Clown; "No." Pantaloon I have 10s., that's all." TliL- Sprite then held out a shilling, saying,|" That's all." One of the gentlemen who had remained in the stalls then threw a shilling upon the stage, which the Sprite picked up. The shilling was followed by several others, and by a shower of coppers, amongst which were sundry farthings from the" gods," some of which fell upon the slage, others in the orchestra, striking the musicians, who had remained at their posts during the whole disturbance. Several of the supernumeraries then rushed on the stage, and a re- gular scramble, to the great delight of the "gods," took place for the money. However, the gods" insisted upon its being handed over to the Sprite, who, amidst overwhelming applause, bowed his acknowledgments. The curtain then rose upon "The Fairy Realms." Such a scene-a piece of scenery in one place, another in another, and a regular mass of confusion. A few fairies" stood in the background, some were in their places, others stood laughing. Frameworks of iron where fairies should have stood were empty, and, amidst a flickering ray or two of blue and red coloured fire, the curtain fell upon a scene of confusion such as we have never before witnessed upon a stage. The lights were then lowered, and the noises and groans in the gallery amongst the "gods" were greater than ever. The writer was glad to beat a hasty retreat, and to find himself safe in the street, where there was a crowd of persons, men, women, and boys, sur- rounding the entrance to the stage-door, some of them swearing that they would not go until they had got their money. Their language was loud as to what they would do if they did not have their money. The "performance" was not concluded until a little before Sunday morning, and when the writer left the spot the noisy amusement" seemed to be at its height.

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SIR ROWLAND HILL to the RESCUE

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jSPIRIT-MEDIUMS AMONG THE…