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DUELS OF GERMAN STUDENTS.

AN ARCHBISHOP LYING IN STATE.

BEEF, CHURCHES, ORGANS, ETC.,…

ADVENTURES of a FEDERAL RECRUIT.

A SKETCH IN SCOTLAND. !

SKETCHES FROM AFRICA.

FREEDOM BEFORE FOOD.

! NOT A BAD IDEA OF KING WILLIAM.

LITIGATION BETWIXT FATHER…

SKETCHES FROM SCHLESWIG.

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE at a.…

THE LAST OF THE LUTHERS!

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THE "ALABAMA" AGAIN!

A TOUCHING STORY. ---

CANDEL4BM FOR IIIS NIZAM.

WAR NEWS FROM NEW YORK.

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WAR NEWS FROM NEW YORK. The burden of the present letter from "Manhattan" is war. It is fully as caustic as any we have had previously through the London Standard from New York, but is of more interest than some of late, as it enters rather fullv into the question of the Union and how to revive it.' We re- produce the most interesting portioasot the letter for our readers ;— FAR FROM THE END OF THE WAR. It is gravely announced by the journals in the con- fidence of the Administration that it has positive evidence that the Confederate Government will soon evacuate Iticbmond, and that already the arsenals, (See., have been taken to Columbia, South Caroliua, Many persons believe it. It is also announced that Meade will advance to the rebel capital this month, I am inclined to believe that he will start, but I have no faith that he will proceed many miles on his road before he will meet General Lee and his army of veterans. Then will come a great battle and that, of course, will be doubtful. The chances of buch a battle, or of its results, if I was inclined to, bet, would be decidedly in favour of Lee. He has his divisions in hand; Meade has not. Lee has self-reliance; Meade has not, for he knows that he is a perfect igno- ramus, so far as properly handling large bodies of men is concerned. He has to fight, because he is ordered from Washington to go ahead. I may be mistaken, but when I see our forces falling off—when I see our perfect confidence and lack of preparation—it appears to me that the opening campaigns will give some bril- liant and some decided victories to the South. We are far from the end of the war. We cannot tell when that will end. There will never be disunion for any length of time. Eventually there will be a compro- mise that will satisfy tnis generation of men of both aides. A WASHINGTON NEEDED FOR THE SOUTH Slavery seems to be going to the wall. I sup- pose that will be destroyed. It might yet be saved. If the South had a brilliant general, who would dash into Washington, proclaim that he was on his way to New York, offer a new Union wherein the Southern property was to be respected, and a truce to be held until a. ne w election was held, as a guarantee that a Southern man should bo elected President, the South would save slavery, and renew their power, for the Democratic party would be captured by such a pro- gramme, but a separation for ever is utterly impossi- ble. It is a dream. It can never be realised. I so wrote you years aso. I have witnessed the awful spilling of blood, loss of life, and all the horrors of civil war, and yet have seen no change in the stern determination of the North. It is fiercer than ever. Unless the Southern leaders can so act as to carry with them the Democratic millions north, west, and east, they will fail in savincr themselves or slavery. The North is in favour of tbe Union, and, though the majority would be willing to compromise and let the South govern, and save slavery, yet they will see the Southern people butchered like sheep before they will consent to even the talk of a separation. HOW TO BRING THE SOUTH TO THEIR SENSES To the astonishment of every one, 38,000 prisoners have been placed in the hands of General Butler. It is stated that he has a plan that will bring the Southern Government to its senses, and ensure better treatment to our prisoners in Richmond and prisons South. From Butler's well-known cruel but decided character, we can easily conjecture what his treatment will be. God have mercy upon the prisoners. If what I have heard probable should happen, it will make one howl of agony South, or they will treat our prisoners better. Butler will have them stripped naked (the thermo- meter yesterday was 5 degrees below zero, and has been 45), chained, and placed in 38 pens, where a spring of water is found. He will feed them on her- rings—one a day full allowance. In a week or so the deaths will amount to 800 a day, and keep reducing until the prisoners are dead. In less than a wtek, I think, even grim Jeff Davis will cave, and treat our prisoners in a luxurious manner, giving them feather beds to sleep on, and ice cream in addition to the regular dinner. Butler's plan may be harsher than this, but I cannot see how he can adopt a more cruel method. THE PRESIDENT'S LATEST JOKE ON ANOTHER METHOD Those most in the confidence of the President say that there will be no battle allowed at present—that Mr. Lincoln does not want the war cloaed until slavery is utterly broken up, and that to the last hour of his administration—March, 1865—he will keep the troops back while slavery is being crushed out in the States. He wishes the slaves to be armed as fast as they come in, and thus raise up a vast and overwhelming army of negroes in the rebel States. He is a funny joker. A few days ago a person gave him a plan for capturing Richmond. It was, to have the prisoners rise, and overpower the garrison in Richmond, and then have General Butler to co-operate with them. The Presi- dent replied 1- I have great confidence in General Butler, but I am not so sure about Richmond. Your plan reminds me of a story told of a lot of Methodist ministers who were the trustees of a Western college. It so happened that the college was connected with a neighbouring town by a bridge, and that this bridge was subject to be carried away byfreshets. Atlasttheyhelda special session, to receive the plans of a noted bridge builder, a good mechanic, but "ather a profane man. Can you build this bridge," asked a reverend gentleman. "Build it," bluntly replied the mechanic, "I could build a bridge to h This horrified the trustees, and after the bridge builder had retired, the minister who had recommended him thought proper to apologise. I feel confident," said he, that our energetic friend could build a safe bridge to Hades, although I am not so sure of the abutment on the other side. And so with your plan. I have great confidence in General Butler, but douht the strength of the Unionists in Richmond. The President must have spent his early years in getting up-jokes and storiep. He is a wonderful man in that regard. He is the first Presidential joker this country has ever had, out of 16 Presidents. HOW TO RAISE TROOPS The news to-day is this. A bill has been introduced into Congress authorising the President to raise one million of troops. The idea is this. We started to raise 300,000, and only got as far as 30,000. Now, if we start for a million, we may get 10 per cent. of them, or 100,000. If the plan succeeds, then a new bill will be passed by Congress authorising the President to raise ten millions of troops. This will give us one million. Seriously, the only enlistments now that seem to give general satisfaction are the negro enlist- ments. All are in favour of them. The Democrats hope that every darky in the city will not only be sent off, but that he will be killed in battle or die of disease. FREMONT IN FAVOUR. We havenews in circulation to-day in Wall-street to the effect that the President will recal Fremont to the army. His friends have given assurances that if this is done, the name of Fremont will bring 50,000 young men more into the field. If carried out, they will fill graves. I do not believe Fremont could raise 50 men. He is as great an ignoramus in war matters as is M'Clellau, and we shall need generals that are really so before nel t June.

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ADVICE TO FEDERAL AMERICA.

SCENE IN IA THEATRE.

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SIR ROWLAND HILL to the RESCUE

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jSPIRIT-MEDIUMS AMONG THE…