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,-(Due foukt Comspntat.

--THE HORRORS OF BEDLAM.

A REAL BIT OF ROMANCE !

A VIOLENT LOVER IN CAMBRIDGE.

THE END OF A POLISH PATRIOT.

THE LANCASHIRE DISTRESS.

MR, BRIGHT EXPLAINS THE REAL…

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MR, BRIGHT EXPLAINS THE REAL CAUSE! Mr. Bright, M.P., and Mr. SchoIeBeld. M.P., at- tended a meeting in the Town-hall at Birmingham, on Tuesday evening, for the purpose of addressing their constituents on public affairs. The hall was crowded in every part. Mr. Bright made one of his usual effective speeches, from which we give our readers the following extract:— You know, of course, living in Birmingham, as well as we know, that, contrary to what exists in some countries, we have three great classes connected with land-the land- owner first, who is always becoming richer, that is, if he does not spend too much his land is always becoming more valuable you find him living in a better house, with more gorgeous fittings and with more splendid equipages. (A Voice.—" And so is the cotton owner.") No doubt, if you pursue it further, you will find the tenant farmer occupying larger fatms, and with much greater apparent wealth but If you come to the labourers who cultivate the land, by whose toil and whose sweat your tables are furnished with bread and with beef, and with many other things that they produce, you find those labourers at this moment, I believe, at a greater distance from the landlord and from the tenant probably than they were almost at any former period. (Hear, hear., A Voice.—" No.") There is a gentleman in the body of the hall who evidently differs from me. I am very glad he is in the meeting. I would ask you whether in past years you have ever read any letters in the Times newspaper signed "S. G. O."? Those letters were written by a gentleman of rara intelligence and of great benevolence, and his description, I believe, may be entirely relied upon. If any of you happened to read, some three or four months ago, letters written from parts of Buckinghamshire and published in the Star newspaper with regard to the condition of that population, you will know what it is that I mean. But if you are unwillingto take their evidence, let us take that of a witness that nobody here will call in question, and that is the evidence of the Saturday Review. [Here Mr. Bright quoted from the Saturday Reviexo of the 26th of September. He then proceeded- ] They tell you your agriculture is far better than the agriculture of any other country that you produce-a larger quantity of wheat than any other producer from a given surface. We know that there is the greatest market in the world close at our doors, and the means of conveyance to eve'y part of the kingdom. Then, I want to know, why it is that the labouring population on the farms of this country are in the condition in which they are described. Is it so in the most civilised countries in Europe? Is it so in the United States of America ? I could give it to you—only that reading evidences from Cooks is not suited to a meeting like this—from the highest in rank, from thtl most culti- vated in mind, from those most extensively known in public affairs, and I could prove to you beyond all con- test that in all those countries of Europe where the land is divided, and the people have the chance of having some of it—at least, those who are industrious and frugal—that the condition of the agricultural peasant population is infinitely superior to anything to be seen in Great Britain and Ireland. Well, then, you may ask me very reasonably what is the difference between the laws of these countries and the laws of ours, and what changes do you propose? I will tell you in as few words as I can. In the greatest portion of the Continent of Europe, in France, in Germany, in Belgium, in Holland, in Norway, and it Is likely to spread over Europe, the state of the Jaw is this. It follows what I believe to he the natural law of 1 affection and justice between parents and children, that a large portion of the property of the parent mmt be by will, or, if not by will, the law will order it to be equally divided among the children. That is the case with] respect to all property but land. All the property of the parent, according to the number of his children, must be divided among them, except what may be given by will. You are not to be frightened by this law of bequest, as if it was something very dreadful. Why, it only follows the rule which merchants and manufacturers and aU other people in the world have followed in latter days in treat- ing their children with equal affection and equal justice. Go to the United States, and you will see a different state of the law from what you will find in this country. There a man may leave his property as he likes among his children. Because the United States' law believes that natural affection and justice form of themselves a sufficient law in the majority of cases, and, therefore, that it is not necessary to enforce them by any statute. If a man dies without a will, the law of the United States takes hh property, and, looking upon his children with equal affection and equal justice, makes that distribution which it believes the just and loving parent would have made. But if you come to this country, what do you find? This/-that with regard to all kinds of property, except that which is called real property—the land of the country and the houses upon it—our law does exactly the same. It divides it equally among the children, because it knows that that is what the parent should have done and would have done if he had been a good parent. But when it comes to the question of land, then, contrary to the European law, which mattes a statute according to natural justice, con- trary to the United States' law, which, when there is no will, makes a law in accordance with natural justice, our law does exactly that which natural justice would forbid. I should like to know if anybody is prepared to deny this. Personalty,—that is, property which is not land, —is divided equally the property which is tand is not divided equally, but is given to the oldest son in a lump. Now, tell me whether the principles which the law of Europe for the most part wishes to enforce, that which the law of America enforces when there is no will, that which we enforce" hen land is out of the question-^tell me if that is not a more just law, approving itself to the hearts of men and before the eye of Heaven, than the law by which we send as beggars into the world half-a-dozen children in order that we make one rich ill the possession of the land ? What are the reasons? These things are not done without reasons. Ask anybody what arc the reasons, for they are high political reasons. Now, these reasons are very curious in some countries. In Turkey it has been the custom a long time—it is hardly broken down yet—that the wielder of the sceptre should even destroy his younger brothers, lest they should become competitors with him for the throne. What would you think if the law of this country doomed the younger children to the want of free- dom and the want of education, and conferred freedom and education on the elder son, leaving the rest to go into the streets ? But it would be just as reasonable to cut off all the younger boys andgili: from education, as it is to cut th m off f; om their fair share of their fathel's property. The hon. gentleman then discussed the effect of primogeniture as it existed in America and as now altered by law, showing how the possessors of land there, as in other countries, must be the possessors of political power. He also showed the clfecb of emi- gra'iononthe laboui ir.g classes and what it did in respect of "taking off the scales" from their eyes con- cerning the English property and other laws. He believed, too, that the present landed proprietors were anything but an intelligent class, and that there was some trouble in teaching them even how to benefit themselves, as he found in advocating the corn laws, many years since and the great evil of the time was that property was coming more and more into fewer hands. He finished his speech by referring to what was going on in Ireland and elsewhere and though he advocated emigration, he said he did not wish his own country to be anything but great and free.

THE REPEAL OF THE MALT.TAX.

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----INSTANCES OF HIGH CIVILISATION.

A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY IN CUMBER-LAND.

A ROMANCE IN LOW LIFE.

'"9"""= EXTRACTS FROM "MANHATTAN'S"…

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HOW to DISPOSE of TWO MILLIONS…

LAYING CLAIM TO AN ESTATE.

ITHE MURDER NEAR LEOMINSTER.

O'KANE v. O'KANE AND LORD…

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THE PARISIANS OFFENDED!

AN ILLUSTRIOUS VISITOR!

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