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,-(Due foukt Comspntat.

--THE HORRORS OF BEDLAM.

A REAL BIT OF ROMANCE !

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A REAL BIT OF ROMANCE The Cork Examiner vouches for the truth of the following bit of romance in real life, which reminds one of Ireland 60 years ago:— On last Tuesday week one of the largest audiences ever assembled in Cork Theatre was attracted by the promised attendance at the performance of the fox- hunters of the outh of Ireland in full hunting costume. Connected with this incident is a story which contains a strong spice of romance. A gentleman residing in Cork, of considerable eminence in the scientific world, as well as distinguished in the hunting-field, and in social circles, was recently at aball near Queenstown, at which a young lady of great beauty was present. In the course of the evening the gentleman, who had been but a short time previously introduced to the lady, managed to monopolise her conversation so much as to excite some little annoyance among various other gentlemen present. Among these were two English officers, one of whom, in the course of the evening, made a remark to the Irish gentleman, which, by implication, meant that he would not be as successful in more manly contests. The Irish gentleman at once accepted the implied challenge, and said that, if the lady would give him her bracelet to wear as a gage at the next day's hunt, which was to come off near Fermoy, he would undertake to come in at the finish before either of the two officers, and would then write a song to be dedicated to the lady, and in her praise, which he would get set to music, and afterwards have sung before one of the largest audiences ever assembled in the Cork Theatre. {The wager was at once accepted. 20i. being the sum staked. The lady with much spirit gave her bracelet, the hunt came off, the gentleman wore it, and rode in triumphantly at the head of the field. He afterwards did compose the song, and got it set to music, and this was the pretty ballad which Mr. Bowler sang so charmingly after the opera. To secure the large house on that night, the patronage of the fox hunters of the south of Ireland was obtained by the gentleman who played such a prominent part in the transaction, and the highly successful result was to be found in the crammed condition of every part of the building. The next morning a letter was delivered to the hero of the adventure, containing a cheque for 20 £ from his rival, with whom he had made the bet. who thus acknowledged our countryman's superiority as a courtier, a cavalier, and a poet. The following is the song :— Thy colours in my cap I wore, Thy presence in my heart I bore Surely a charmed life was mine Since it in thought was linked with thine. Dora mia, Dora mi, Only love me as 110ve thee. No craven fear my bosom crost, I cared not if the race were lost; So thou could'Bt look on me with pride For thee I'd willingly have died. Dora mia, Dora mi, Only love me as I love thee. But, thanks to fate, the word's reversed, And I can sing what I've rehearsed So often in the weary night, For thee I win! for thee I fight! For thee I win for thee I fight! Dora mia, Dora mi, Only love me as I love thee. Then, as reward for every task Performed by thee, I only ask, One single, simple glance of love irom the bright eyes of my own Dove. Dora mia, Dora ml, Only love me as I love thee. [There Is only wanting the usual termination to tales of this sort, viz.—" and they were shortly after mar- ried," &c. But perhaps this is to come.]

A VIOLENT LOVER IN CAMBRIDGE.

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THE LANCASHIRE DISTRESS.

MR, BRIGHT EXPLAINS THE REAL…

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----INSTANCES OF HIGH CIVILISATION.

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A ROMANCE IN LOW LIFE.

'"9"""= EXTRACTS FROM "MANHATTAN'S"…

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HOW to DISPOSE of TWO MILLIONS…

LAYING CLAIM TO AN ESTATE.

ITHE MURDER NEAR LEOMINSTER.

O'KANE v. O'KANE AND LORD…

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THE PARISIANS OFFENDED!

AN ILLUSTRIOUS VISITOR!

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