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RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN AUSTRIA.I

SERVANTS AND THEIR CHARACTERS.

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A WINTER IN ITALY.

THE INNISKILLINGS AND THE…

THE NEW [STRUGGLE FOR LIBERTY…

THE ADVENTURES OF A CHIMNEY.

WOMEN IN RANGOON.

A BATH BY INSTALMENTS.

INTERESTING SCIENTIFIC FACTS.

THE LAW OF LADIES' BONNETS!

A SWISS TRAGEDY.

WHERE WILL IT END?

A WELCOME TO THE BABY PRINCE.

THE NEW MORGUE IN PARIS.

DISEASES OF OVERWORKED MEN.

A WOMAN'S RIGHTS IN SLAVERY.…

LOOKING FOR A SUPPER.

ENGLAND AND THE WAR IN NEW…

The ^Latte. CONSPIRACY to…

TO THE EDITOR.

lOSMINISCENCE OF THACKERAY.

DEATH OF " A MAN OF MARK !"

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DEATH OF A MAN OF MARK A man of great mark and influence has just passed away (writes a New York correspondent). JohnHughen. Catholic Archbishop of New York, died on Sunaa/, at the age cf 65, from softening of the brain and general prostration of the powers of life. He came to America a poor Irish boy, began life as a shopman or assistant to a florist in New York, and entering the Church at an early age, succeeded, by dint of pliancy, industry, and native talent, in working him- self up to the high ecclesiastical position which he has held for the last 2G years, as bishop and archbishop. He exercised an enormous influence over the Irish Roman Catholic population—not so much for leading them in political affairs as for following the current of their opinions and prej udices, and for his thorough per- sonal sympathy in all their feelings of nationality. He was entirely a manof the people, and, if .some what anti- English, was more so from policy than from convic- tion. He was not an opponent of slavery, for if he had been, he would have placed himself in antagonism, not only to his Church, but to the sentiment of the whole Irish population. He was deliberately opposed to an enforced military conscription, and during the riots of last July took no pains to conceal either from the Government or the people that he considered the draft unwise, or unjust, if not tyrannical. As befitted his sacred character, he was a friend of peace, and seeing high above the madness of the crowd to those serener altitudes of thought where passion has no foothold, he took occasion to impress upon the minds of the youthful students of the Ecclesiastical College of St. Xavier, and upon those of his flock, that the liberty of the Rwpublic was to be prized as something far more estimable than extent of territory, and that the happiness of a State was to be considered better worth securing than its "bigness."

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