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RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN AUSTRIA.I

SERVANTS AND THEIR CHARACTERS.

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A WINTER IN ITALY.

THE INNISKILLINGS AND THE…

THE NEW [STRUGGLE FOR LIBERTY…

THE ADVENTURES OF A CHIMNEY.

WOMEN IN RANGOON.

A BATH BY INSTALMENTS.

INTERESTING SCIENTIFIC FACTS.

THE LAW OF LADIES' BONNETS!

A SWISS TRAGEDY.

WHERE WILL IT END?

A WELCOME TO THE BABY PRINCE.

THE NEW MORGUE IN PARIS.

DISEASES OF OVERWORKED MEN.

A WOMAN'S RIGHTS IN SLAVERY.…

LOOKING FOR A SUPPER.

ENGLAND AND THE WAR IN NEW…

The ^Latte. CONSPIRACY to…

TO THE EDITOR.

lOSMINISCENCE OF THACKERAY.

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In a letter to Lc Tewps, full of the most generous feeling and of fine and penetrating criticism of the genius of our great departed humorist, whose friendship he had enjoyed, M. Louis Blanc relates in his own inimitable style (which we can only paraphrase) the following characteristic) anecdote A few years ago the London papers announced that a Frenchman, whose name I need not give you, was going to deliver in English what is here called a lecture. Foremost among those who were moved by a feeling of delicate kindness and hospitable curiosity to encourage the lecturer with their presence was Thackeray. When the lecture was over, the manager of the literary institution where it was delivered, for some reason or other, recommended the company to take care of their pockets in the crowd at the doors; a hint which was not particularly to the taste of a highly- respectable and even distinguished audience. Some even protested, and none more warmly than an un- known person, very well dressed, sitting next to Mr. Robert Bell. Not content with speaking, this un- known person gesticulated in a. singularly animated manner. Isn't such a suggestion indecent, sir, in- sulting ?" said he to Mr. Bell. "What does he take us for ?" &c., &c. After giving vent to his indignation in this way for some moments, the susceptible stranger disappeared, and when Mr. Robert Bell, who wanted to know how long the lecture had lasted, put his hand to his watch-pocket, behold I his watch had disap- peared likewise. Thackeray, to whom his excellent friend mentioned the mishap, invited Robert Bell to dinner a day or two after. When the day came, Robert Bell took his seat at his friend's table, round which a joyous company of wits were gathered, and soon found himself encircled by a rattling fire of banter about an article of his which had just appeared in the Cornhill Magazine, then conducted by Thackeray; an article remarkably in all respects, and which had attracted universal notice, as a faithful, serious, and philosophical account of some effects of spiritism, which the authpf' had witnessed at a seance given by Mr. Home. Air. Robert Bell is an admirable ca use ur; his talk is a happy: mixture of all Englishman's good sense and an Irish- man's verve. So his questioners found their match in brilliant fence. Next day a mysterious messenger arrived at Air. Robert Bell's, and handed to him, without-saying who had sent it, a box containing a note, worded, as nearly as I recollect, as follows The spirits present their compliments to Mr. Robert Bell, and, as a mark of their gratitude to him, they have the honour to return him the watch that was stolen from him." And a watch it' really was that the box contained, but. a watch far liner and richer than the one which had dis- appeared. Mr. Robert Bell thought at once of Thackeray, and wrote to him without further explanation I don't know if it is you, but it is very like you." Thackeray, in reply, sent a caricature portrait of himself, drawn by his own hand, and representing a winged spirit in a flowing robe, and spectacles on nose. Thackeray had in early life taken to painting, and perhaps, if he had pursued his first vocation, he might nave come in time to handle the brush as well as afterwards handled the pen. At any rate the drawing in question, as I can bear witness, was one to britig tears into your eyes for laughing. It was accom' panied by a note, asfollows :— The spirit Gabriel presents his compliments to Mr. Robert Bell, and takes the liberty to communicate to him the portrait of the person who stood the watch. Now, is not this bit of a story charming ? What grace what delicacy what humour in this inspira- tion of a friend who, to punish his friend for having done the spirits the honour to speak of them, sends him with a smile a magnificent present! Honourable to Thackeray, this anecdote is equally so to Robert BelJ, who could inspire such feelings in such a man. And this is why I feel a double pleasure in relating it.

DEATH OF " A MAN OF MARK !"

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