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RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN AUSTRIA.I

SERVANTS AND THEIR CHARACTERS.

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A WINTER IN ITALY.

THE INNISKILLINGS AND THE…

THE NEW [STRUGGLE FOR LIBERTY…

THE ADVENTURES OF A CHIMNEY.

WOMEN IN RANGOON.

A BATH BY INSTALMENTS.

INTERESTING SCIENTIFIC FACTS.

THE LAW OF LADIES' BONNETS!

A SWISS TRAGEDY.

WHERE WILL IT END?

A WELCOME TO THE BABY PRINCE.

THE NEW MORGUE IN PARIS.

DISEASES OF OVERWORKED MEN.

A WOMAN'S RIGHTS IN SLAVERY.…

LOOKING FOR A SUPPER.

ENGLAND AND THE WAR IN NEW…

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ENGLAND AND THE WAR IN NEW ZEALAND. The following, from the Times, explains the feeling of England in respect to war with her colonies, and also gives, in a small compass, the gist of the quarrel in New Zealand: England does not go into war until driven into it; nor does she continue war a day longer than necessary. She never declines honest and reasonable overtures. She does not want to dispossess a single savage of his hut or his field, even though at home, under the pressure of social necessity, she has seen immense classes of indigenous peasants ousted of their holdings, and hereditary landlords of their estates. Our ex- tensive colonial literature, our great geographical curiosity, our missions, our churches rising up every- where, in the remotest wilderness, all testify to the fact that it is not the territory, but the people, whom we wish to call our own and that the interest of the possession disappears when the aboriginal race is either extinct or is reduced to a miserable remnant. We read with delight of native chiefs, native cere- monies, native councils, the eloquence of native ora- tors and the wisdom of natives, of native traditions and rules of State. Such are our feelings, and they spring from the same source as that varied henevo- lence which at home penetrates every alley and every cottage in this country. We should all be rejoiced to hear that peace had been obtained upon terms which saved our honour and the British sovereignty, even though it added nothing to the soil ia our possession. We should deem it a heavy item in any indictment against the Colonial Governor that he had neglected a fair opportunity of peace, or stood out for terms which the natives could not be expected to accept. As to confiscation, that is a question which, by the experience of all wars and treaties, cannot be dismissed in a breath. The expenses of the wtr must be paid; s outrage and fraud must be mulcted; military positions must be held for security but, no doubt, we should all of us be very glad to hear that order had been res- tored without any violent interference with the former state of property and occupation. It appears that the Government of New Zealand, about four years ago, did wliat many a man ha3 done to his cost in this country. It purchased some land from a dishonest chief, who failed to inform it either as ta the claims upon the land or his own complicity in those claims, or the actual occupation of parts of t I the laud, or his own intended reserve. It is difficult to conceive how any Government could be so egre- giously duped, and we must either suppose there is some unexplained mystery, or that rreira-like many savages and many apparently stupid men among its-- was, under the guise of simplicity, a consummate rogue. However this may be, the purchased land had been c eu d occupied by our troops, and the supposed intruders dispossessed. Sir George Grey, even after a disaster and under circumstances too likely to lower the native opinion of our firmness and courage, had agreed to throw up this untoward purchase, and wipe his hands of the quarrels thence arising. But neither this nor any other possible concession could touch the main difficul; y. W. King, the person who some years ago saw in these quarrels the prospect of founding a native sovereignty, and has had some success, has laid down laws limiting 1" the pater of the natives to dispose of their own lands, with the avowed object of confiningthe British colonists to the immediate neighbourhood of the ports. This man ii.;siaipiy a usurper, his laws are simply usurpa- tions ;and bfith he and they have no other sanctioll than ort which he may happen to receive. |

The ^Latte. CONSPIRACY to…

TO THE EDITOR.

lOSMINISCENCE OF THACKERAY.

DEATH OF " A MAN OF MARK !"

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