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RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN AUSTRIA.I

SERVANTS AND THEIR CHARACTERS.

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A WINTER IN ITALY.

THE INNISKILLINGS AND THE…

THE NEW [STRUGGLE FOR LIBERTY…

THE ADVENTURES OF A CHIMNEY.

WOMEN IN RANGOON.

A BATH BY INSTALMENTS.

INTERESTING SCIENTIFIC FACTS.

THE LAW OF LADIES' BONNETS!

A SWISS TRAGEDY.

WHERE WILL IT END?

A WELCOME TO THE BABY PRINCE.

THE NEW MORGUE IN PARIS.

DISEASES OF OVERWORKED MEN.

A WOMAN'S RIGHTS IN SLAVERY.…

LOOKING FOR A SUPPER.

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LOOKING FOR A SUPPER. Mr. Sala, the well-known author and correspondent of the Daily Telegraph, in a letter to that paper gives the following amusing account of a supper which he sought in an Ameri- can hotel, and of the •' helps" who assisted" him thereatj The presence of style in the Tremont House, St. Alban's, however perfect it may be, fails, perhaps, to compensate for the absence of suppers. There was on the occasion described in my last letter, a power- fully meaty smell in the refectory, recalling the odour of an engine factory next door to a cookshop, but for a long time nothing else. At last one attendant Hebe appeared with cheese and crackers—stylish to look at, but undeniably nubbly. This Hebe was Irish; she was a stout but uncombed young person. Soon afterwards another waitress en- tered. This nymph was tall and gaunt and American. She bore a huge pitcher of iced water-a most welcome beverage, but somewhat cold comfort for Christmas. I should have preferred egg-hot. I thought, when I saw the Vermontese nymph's apron and bib, and her hair screwed off her temples in butterfly bows, with a high comb behind, that I beheld the versatile Mrs. Barney Williams in her admired impersonation of the "Yankee Gal." For the nonce I elected to be Pesky Ike," and expected every moment to be addressed as keemo kimo," and asked whether I would have my high, my low," or "my right fol iddle diddle" for supper — The female Vermonter was a Pliillia, br.t not neat- handed. In a nasal contralto, to which the grossest caricature of the American dialect I ever heard on the English stage was perfectly tame, she asked me if I would have "steak or tryaipe." A taste for tripo is among the few human vices to which I am not ad- dicted and my brief experience of American beef had not led me to look upon steak as a very dainty viand. I asked, failing offal, if I could have any- thing else. "No," curtly replied Mrs. Barney Williams, "youkyant; ain't that enough ?" I bowed, and said I would take steak. She brought me, on a cold plate, a curled-up flap of something hard and greasy and cartilaginous, which looked unpleasantly like a piece of an Ethiop's ear, fried. I asked if I could have anything to drink with my supper — some beer, some cider, or some wine. This is not a bar," said Mrs. Barney Williams, severely; "guess there's water and tea, and that's all." Upon which I made some rather uncompli- mentary allusions to Mr. Niel Dow and the Maine Liquor Law. This brought in the landlord, who, with sedate affability, whispered that he could "get" me any- thing I wanted" quietly." I declined, however, to be supplied surreptitiously, and as a favour, with that to which I conceived that, as a peaceable bona fide traveller, I had a right; and as I couldn't get on with the fried Ethiop's ear after the first mouthful, I re- tired from the hall" sulky and supperless. I did not care to bandy words with the Phillis who was not neat-handed. She did not like me evidently, and I reciprocated the sentiment, But, for anything I knew to the contrary, she might be the sheriff's daughter or the mayor's sister-in-law, and accustomed to go out on Sundays with a "magnolious" parasol and a "spanglorlous" crinoline. An American help" is no menial. She is spoken of, not satirically, but in simple good faith, as "the young lady" who picks up" the house, and fixes" the dinner table. Before she agrees to enter a family she cross-examines her mistress as to whether the house is provided with Hecker's flour, and Berbe's range, brass pails, oil-cloth on the stairs, and hot and cold water laid on. Then she states the domestic "plat- form" on which she is prepared to act. "Monday I bakes, and nobody speaks to me. Tuesday I washes I'se to be let alone. Wednesday I irons you'd best let me be that day. Thursday I picks up the house I'm awful ugly that day in temper, but affectionate. Friday I bakes again. Saturday my beau comes. And Sunday I has to myself." The "help," I repeat, is a young lady. She devours with avidity the romances, all about love and murder, in the New York Ledger. She attends lectures, and may some day deliver lectures herself, or become a member of a Woman's Rights Convention and it is because she is a young lady, and the persons who require her assistance do not choose to run the risk of being driven raving mad by her perversity and her impertinence, that so many married couples in the United States never venture on housekeeping for themselves, but live from year's end to year's end in uproarious and comfortless hotels.

ENGLAND AND THE WAR IN NEW…

The ^Latte. CONSPIRACY to…

TO THE EDITOR.

lOSMINISCENCE OF THACKERAY.

DEATH OF " A MAN OF MARK !"

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