Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

32 articles on this Page

#ur fsmiwm Comsptbettf.

[No title]

- COMMERCIAL FRAUDS AT SUNDER.…

ITHE ROYAL BIRTH.

INTERESTING EXTRACTS FROM…

[No title]

[No title]

The SHAKSPEARE COMMEMORATION.

[No title]

The following in a measure…

jA SHAKSPEARE JUBILEE A CENTURY…

! HOW the INSURRECTION in…

CARDINAL WISEMAN'S PASTORAL.

A CURIOUS CASE DECIDED.

AWFUL EXPLOSION AT LIVERPOOL.

WHAT IT IS COMING TO.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

HINTS ABOUT AUSTRALIAN EMIGRATION.

ALAS FOR POLAND

DEATH of the DUKE of ATHOLE,…

A TALE FOR THE SUPERSTITIOUS!

A LESSON TO REPORTERS AND…

News
Cite
Share

A LESSON TO REPORTERS AND OTHERS! Under the euphonious title of "Slobbering Loyalty," the Spectator makes, amongst others, the following remarks on the phraseology employed to announce the birth of the Prince of Wales:- On the present occasion, everybody, from the doctors down to the sellers of the broad sheets—except, we are most happy to say, the Prince of Wales him- self—descended into the abysses of fustian. The bul- letin writers of the telegraph may be excused, but the bulletin-writing doctors might know better than to write nonsense about the princess being happily de- livered of a prince," as if the word meant something epicene, or a new species of being. We thought Thackeray had put down this form of imbecility when he sang the ballad of the Duke and Prince Arthurs- Then Mrs. Lily, the nuas, Towards them steps with joy Says the brave old Duke, "Com". tell to us Is it a gal or a boy ?" Says Mrs. L. to the Duke, "Your grace, it is a prince." Anti at that nuss's bold rebuke lie did both laugh and wince. The Prince of Wales himself rebuked this nauseous rubbish by announcing officially to the Mayor of Windsor that the Princess had been safely delivered of a fine boy, and both were doing well He Mt, we doubt not, what flunkeys cannot be made to see, that in great events homeliness is dignity, that when the fate of Germany hung on the birth of a son to the Emperor Frederic, the mode in which Maria Theresa announced the event was more stately than any verbal flourish. She rushed into her box at the theatre, ex- claiming to the audience, "Fritz has a boy and the whole assembly acknowledged, by one burst of emo- tion, their sympathy with her genuineness. Custom deadens the sense of absurdity but change the form just a little, and it will b3 perceived. Imagine the announcement that the Princess "had just been de- livered of a royal highness," or a queen of a being ready equipped with all the titles belonging to a Prince of Wales 1 We do not belong to those who think that tbe ceremonial of the monarchy is unimportant, still less with those who agree with a well-known corres- pondent of Le Temps, that the marriage of the heir to the throne is merely "the wedding of ayoung man to a young woman;" but the child of an emperor at the moment of birth is boy or girl, and no more. To dis- sociate etiquette from nature and common sense is to ensure its ultimate destruction. It _is bad enough to see in the papers the lady of Blank Smith, Esq., of a son," but even the English middle class, except when writing of royalty, do not stultify themselves by the "lady ofBlank Smith, Esq, of a young gentle- man." Yet that is not more ridiculous than the use of prince for boy when the simple object is to mark sex and we do trust reporters in future will take a lesson from the highly-placed gentlemen they think it their duty to beslobber. The Examiner also has an article on the subject, in which it says:— Most cordially do we join in the chorus of congratulation which is still resounding through the country on the late addition to the Royal Family, and, we trust, to the comfort and happiness of the Qneen. But with equal heartiness do we enter our protest against the had language in which this auspicious event has been promulgated. The first announce. ment, indeed which we read in the Times, told us very be- comingly tliatTthe Princess had been delivered" of a fine boy. But to this was subjoined a bulletin, signed by an M D and a surgeon, acquainting us that her Royal Highness was confined of a Prince." Did ever mortal Englishman, educated or uneducated, hear of such an expression 2 We would defy Mrs. Slipslop herself to beat it; and sure we are that the famous Dr. Slop, who ushered Mr. Shandy's son and heir into the world, would have been heartily ashamed of it. Was the word delivered" repudiated as not sufficiently re- flued for these gentlemen ? And yet what expression can be more appropriate, suggestive at once of safety, and of the thankfulness due for the escape from danger ? We always ask ourselves, when reading the fantastic details of the Court movements, what must foreigners think of us ? And in the present instance we blush to imagine the comments on the English reading public who tolerate such trash which must be made by the m: hr strangers to our soil who yet are critically conversant with the Sn^lish tongue. Common sense, grammar, and the real signinedtiaii P* words are all set at nought in the wretched attempt to appear ftbots using the ordinary decent phraseology of our own itill !!n;1 forcible language. Then, again, all subsequent notices of the subject are beaded "Accouchement of the Princess." This is the old story, on which we have heretofore com- mented, of affecting to consider the event too indelicate to be mentioned Itt English, and therefore taking refuge in a foreign tongue, as if, adnUUiog atij Intlelicr.cy to exist, ex- cept in the prurient mind of the woiila-dS 'j'tpiifernist. tji* v idea could be purified and refined by clothing it r!i It is sickening.

WESLEYAN MISSIONARY JUBILEE.

SKATING AT PARIS. *•

DEATHS OF CENTENARIANS! "…

[No title]

I A JACOBITE RHYME REVIVED.