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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

BOLD VICTOR EMMANUEL!

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THE LATE MR. BARON WATSON.

SWITZERLAND HAS "BELLED THE…

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NEWS FROM SEBASTOPOL.

----THE FRIDAY EVENING INTERLUDES…

A TALE OF A CARPET-BAG.

NAPOLEON'S POLICY. 1

A CONTINENTAL MURDER TRAGEDY.

ENGLAND AND FRANCE CONTRASTED.

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ENGLAND AND FRANCE CONTRASTED. The conduct of France is that of a family (says the Tvm-e$< or an individual, who tries to do everything himself, an(j makeaslittleuseas he can of tlieProvidenfcial variety ofhllrnan circumstances and powers. You may here and there ftnd a man teaching his own children, digging his own garden, painting and whitewashing his °W1V ?lencijn^ his own furniture and implements,—perhaps, > clothes,— helping his own servants at all th si c, writing and keep- ing accounts that any-clerk would d employing his leisure hours in ma5in511aii Vnwhms fi bo'U' takinS bail photographs, of"hift« llnf? his clock to pieces, and going to all soits o siutts not to add another item to the tailor's or the shoemaker s hill, at the very time that he is running into the most needless expenses. His rule is to make his servants do everything at home., Xliey roast and grind coflee, wash, brew, bake, and ia solne out-of-the- way places even make the.r own candles and soap they cure their own bacon, preserve their own fruit, and at thb proper season are busy for weeks making elder, currant, raisin, orange, and cowslip wines. Tiie result is that he fills his house with ill-made commodities, from the domestic eau de Cologne down to the burnt bread, sour ale, and fermented preserves. He defrands twenty honest neighbours of their share in his custom, leaving them nothing, not eve.11 the means of huying what he luxs to dispose of wei'e it worth their while, tills is the snijr^jiKj object of French ambition.. France wishes to do everything by herself and so becomes commercially insulated. But like a va'in man who sets himself against the world she finds the world too strong; o her. England is content to work onlv as one of the great brother hood of nations. She gives and "takes in turn, and asks no more than she is ready to bestow Hence it. is that she he- come the world's great benefactor when she aims chiefly at modestly receiving all the benefits which the world is glad, to heap upon her. She accept the services of all who offer and makes them her useful and obliged friends. Thisisto use the world. Our neighbours do not start from the right point. They want to do and be everything to them selves, and then make the world her debtor. This they will hardly do. If they would enjoy our prosperity, they must follow our example which is to suppose the rest of the world as good —neither better nor worse thau ourselves,-— at all events, having a right to share with us the gifts of nature and the benefits of any moral or mental qualities Providence may have given our nation. jumiiiimin'THYiii 1ff':JQ8:C

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