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THE ROYAL CROWN OF ENGLAND.I…

EPITOME OF NEWS.

A GLANCE, AT FOREIGN AFFAIRS…

FOREIGN ITEMS.

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Ipsallattews general ftttos,

HONOUR TO TRUE BRAVERY!

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HONOUR TO TRUE BRAVERY! A late episode in the House of Commons will give much satisfaction to the country. In answer to a question put by Sir F. Baring, Lord Palmerston has promised to take into consideration the bestowal of a suitable reward on Sir L. M'Clintock, who discovered the relics of Sir John Franklin's expedition. The subject of a monument to the unfortunate commander himself was also broached, and the result will be that the self-sacrifice of Franklin and his gallant com- panions will be duly commemorated in some public place or some sacred edifice. Remarking on the subject, the Timet says The justice of thu. honouring these brave dead is, of course, beyond dispute and we think that the propo- sition respecting a reward to Captain M'Clintock will receive as ready an assent. It is the peculiar great- ness of this country that its high achievements are not exclusively due to the impulse of the State. # If a Livingstone explores unknown regions, and raises by his discoveries the character of a continent, he does it without Government aid, as the emissary of a private society, volunteering in the cause of science and re- ligion. So with Captain M'Clintock. The Govern- ment had refused, and < £ htly refused, to send out another expedition to the North Pole. The certainty of Franklin's death had been established, both by the length of time that had elapsed and by the narratives of the aborigines, and the Admiralty could not in justice demand of officers and seamen that they should risk their lives merely to satisfy the curiosity of the public, though such curiosity was certainly legitimate, and we all of us feel gratified at learning at last how the brave explorer died, and what was the end of his still more unhappy survivors. So it was a case for private effort, for the liberality of domestic affection, for the boldness of individual enterprise. That Lady Franklin and her friends should send out the yacht Fox, and that Captain M'Clintock should take command of the little vessel, and with a handful of men penetrate into the most desolate regions on the track of the lost navigators, that he should do all that he aimed at, and lift the veil which covered their fate,—that this, one of the most daring and ro- mantic achievements of our time, should be per- formed without the aid of public money or Ministerial support, are events characteristic of this country. It is the English way of doing things, and as long as it is so the energy and public spirit of the race will survive. But when the thing is done then comes the graceful function of the Crown. To recognise by public ho- nours what has been accomplished by private zeal and enterprise is a principle sanctioned among us, and in accordance with which Sir L. M'Clintock will receive his well-deserved reward.

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