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WHAT THE PAPERS SAY OF THE…

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WHAT THE PAPERS SAY OF THE BUDGET AND THE DEFEAT. The result of the debate is not unexpected. The general principles of the budget are now, we presume, accepted for better or for worse. But it is still in the power of the Eng- lish party in the House of Commons to destroy the most obnoxious features of both treaty and budget, and we trust the opportunity will not be neglected—Morning Herald. THE ORDEAL OF COMMITTEE. Ministers had a majority of 116. Probably they may be satisfied with its magnitude, but even now it will be as well if they put some restraint upon their exultation at the vic- tory they have won. They had better not halloo before they are out of the wood-which they assuredly are not yet. There is such a thing as a committee, and that they may find to be a much more severe ordeal to pass through than they imagine We have seen in our time many a measure so much mangled in committee that when it emerged from it its author could hardly recognise his own offspring. We do not anticipate so rough a handling to the budget of Mr. Gladstone in its passage through committee, but it is at least within the confines of possibility that some important alterations will be made in it.-Morning Advertiser. A GOOD PROSPECT IN THE FUTURE. The majority of 116, in a very full House, against Mr. Du Cane's motion, is just what might be expected from the rather remarkable tact that not one of its supporters, how- ever ingenious or eloquent, has produced one real objection to the treaty with France and the financial measures of Government. There have been objections without number, and they have been stated with effect; but they have all been such as, rightly reasoned upon, told the other way. A very full House of Commons has pronounced strongly in favour of financial liberality and international confidence, as the principles which have conducted us through great difficulties to unexampled prosperity, and which are about to receive a new application, with results immediately perceptible, but of which time alone can tell the full magni- tude.-Times. "10 PJ5ANS" FOR VICTORY! The battle is won. Ancient jealousies and exploded errors have been invoked in vain. Protection may now go back to its holes, and take the spirit of war with it, for through the House of Commons the country has declared for Peace and Free Trade. The majority-" One Hundred and Sixteen is triumphant." This victory will resound throughout Europe, and its fruits will be blessed by our children's children.- Daily News. A SECOND VICTORY IN ONE WEEK. By this division the House has pledged itself to good policy towards England and good faith towards France, No elo- quence could be so effective as the recapitulation of the facts. The second attack on the Government in one week has been defeated by nearly double the numbers that fixed the fate of Mr. Disraeli's first attempt on Tuesday last. Such a result will have immense effect throughout Europe.— Morning Post. THE SEAL OF FREE TRADE. The division challenged on Monday night upon a point of constitutional form, showed a majority of only 63. That number is now nearly doubled-the question at issue being, first, the commercial treaty with France; and secondly, a more complete realisation of the principles of free trade. The House of Commons has now set its seal on both. Once more it is proclaimed that peace and commercial freedom shall be the basis of our national policy.—Morning Chronicle.

THE CUSTOMERS AT OUR SHOP!

A HINT TO VOLUNTEERS.

A SKETCH OF THE POPE IN PUBLIC…

A PERSECUTED PRIEST.

----------.----.----A, FRENCH…

PARLIAMENTARY SCRAPS.

A MYSTERY TO BE UNRAVELLED.

AN ODD PARLIAMENTARY SCENE.

A GOOD TIME COMING! '

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