Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

12 articles on this Page

fianta CarrcsjtotoL. j

WHAT THE PAPERS SAY OF THE…

THE CUSTOMERS AT OUR SHOP!

A HINT TO VOLUNTEERS.

A SKETCH OF THE POPE IN PUBLIC…

A PERSECUTED PRIEST.

----------.----.----A, FRENCH…

News
Cite
Share

A, FRENCH SAVANT'S STRUGGLES. The trial of poor Lablanche, for the illegal practice of medicine, has given us (writes a Paris correspondent) a little practical insight into the reality of that suf- fering amongst savants, of which, when we read, we take no account, deeming it exaggeration of the roman- tic brain. Lablanche, who from his youth up loved to drink for ever at the fountains of science, and could never quench his thirst notwithstanding, after having sacrificed everything to the pursuit of a certain secret in electricity, found it at last-but how? By blowing himself up, and being left for dead, on the floor of the garret, of which the roof had been carried out into the fields by the force of the explosion. The neighbours, who had all rushed to the spot, hastened to convey what they thought the remains of poor Lablanche to the dead-house of the nearest hospital. But there the sur- geon's examination pronounced the man still living, and after much care and curiosity concerning this "inter- esting case," on the part of the doctors, the pieces of the man were so skilfully joined together again that he was pronounced to be no longer of interest sufficent to remain at the hospital, and was sent off to the Bicetre deaf, dumb, and blind! After many years' intense suffering, he became more interesting to the doctors, inasmuch as he was found to be gradually recovering the use of his faculties. When this was almost accom- the use of his faculties. When this was almost accom- plished, the interest ceased once more, and he was therefore bidden to go forth and seek his bread, in order to leave his place to other interesting cases of the like nature. Now it is very well known that the world having no need of savants, they can do nothing but starve, and even that they seem longer about than any other class of men. Lablanche had no clothes, nor money, nor treasure of any kind, but what he carried in his brains—he had no house, and nothing to eat- where was he to go ? What was he to do ? The very first person of whom he made the inquiry, replied promptly, Go on to the open ground of the Boule- vard Sebastopol, and give lectures on chemistry to the .blouses, at a penny a head. Here was Peru! So Lablanche immediately set sail with a bit of canvas rag, a board, and a pair of trestles. In a few weeks his course of lectures became so popular that he was enabled to purchase an electric machine; and with this, so great was' his success, that he was sent for by many doctors to apply it in cases of necessity to their parents. Now set in the tide of popularity. Blouse after blouse was lowered from the shoulders of the wearers in damp weather, when rheumatic pains are sharp, and the sous came pouring into the savant's wooden bowl, like refreshing dew on the parched and thirsting earth. Lablanche was becoming rich; he could already afford an onion to his dry bread, when the large sinewy hand of the sergeant de ville arrested the wheel of fortune in a moment by being extended for the license to practise medicine with which he ought to be provided. Lablanche had never possessed the means of obtaining such a luxury, and canvas, board, and trestles were therefore hauled down in a minute, and, with their owner, carried off to prison. It is comforting to think that the magistrates only inflicted a nominal fine of five francs for the past; but by bidding him go and sin no more, have deprived him of his onion for the future.

PARLIAMENTARY SCRAPS.

A MYSTERY TO BE UNRAVELLED.

AN ODD PARLIAMENTARY SCENE.

A GOOD TIME COMING! '

[No title]