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I GLANCE AT F0RELGN~AFFAIR8.

FOREIGN ITEMS,

IPSALLATMMS CENTRAL FTETE.

A BURNING SHAME!

DREADFUL COLLISION IN THE…

ENGLISHMEN, TREMBLE IN YOUR…

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ENGLISHMEN, TREMBLE IN YOUR SHOES! We have still the misfortune, as you are aware (says the Times correspondent), to stand very low in the estimation or affections of the Spanish people-at least, if their press speak true. Success ought to put people into good humour, and awaken the kindlier feelings of our nature. It is not so just now, it seems, with the Spanish people. The more their arms are covered with victory, the more glorious and rapid the march from Ceuta to Tetuan, the more determined are they to regard all Englishmen with angry eyes. Say what you will, and do all you can, you will not convince them that you are not eaten up by envy at the contemplation of deeds which throw India into the shade, if not fear- ful of a visit to your own dependencies from the conquerors. A letter, dated the 15th, from a very interesting young Guipuzcoan, thus speaks of the effect produced in that corner of Spain by the capture of Tetuan Here we have had four days of rejoicing for the taking of Tetuan. Great exultation and great enthusiasm throughout all Spain; in fact, the country is in a delirium of joy. From the Havannah we hear that the subscription for the war will exceed 3,000,000 of dollars. A friend of ours advances to the Government 15,000 dollars, and five to the soldier who plants the Spanish flag on the walls of Tetuan; and 3,000,000 of reals are laid out on cigars, spirits, and other necessaries for the army. When they shall hare learned that Tetuan is ours the people of the Havannah will actually go mad We have a telegram to-day stating that the little towns close to Tetuan have surrendered, and receive the Spaniards with acclamations-not, of course, as mere conquerors, but as their protectors. I am sorry I cannot send you the Madrid papers giving details of the capture, and of the frenzy ot joy with which the news has been received. Public opinion calls out Forward," and I cannot say where all this will stop. It is said that England is sending a squadron before Tangier, because she sees that that city will also fall into our hands, as Tetuan has fallen. Her selfishness cannot support this. She goes on favouring the "poor Moors," while she forgets the poor Chinese but (and here comes the rather alarming hint), with the ardour of our victories, and with the pride which the Spanish soldier now feels, the slightest incident might provoke a conflict. Even among the most insignificant members of society you constantly hear such words as These scoundrel English—the wretches ought not to be borne with." The press is beginning to take serious notice of the-littleness of the English Embassy, which was the only foreign Legation which refused all demonstration of congratulation for our victories, and already you hear people mutter, "Either Tangier or Gibraltar May Heaven grant that the matter be not aggravated, and that the intolerance of the English may not meet its due

!A WAG ON THE VOLUNTEER SMOVEMENT.

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