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I GLANCE AT F0RELGN~AFFAIR8.

FOREIGN ITEMS,

IPSALLATMMS CENTRAL FTETE.

A BURNING SHAME!

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A BURNING SHAME! All the arguments, all the sneers, against the Rifle Volunteer movement, proceed upon the assumption that this movement will die out almost as speedily as it has risen into significance, and that in another twelvemonth it will be spoken of among Englishmen as a bad joke (says the Times). If this be so, of course the case is disposed of at once, but we are much mistaken as to the spirit of our countrymen, and the true meaning of this movement, if the rifle organisa- tion of 1869 turns out a mere Will-o'-the-Wisp. What are, the facts ? When military men and House of Commons orators had it all their own way, was the country in a state of security ? The late Duke of Wellington in his day had some little reputation as a soldier, and he has left upon record that we were at the mercy of any foreign invader who might choose to venture a coup de main upon our shores. Aye," but said Mills, that's not the fault of the Horse Guards only consent to pay for the articles as per margin, and England shall have the most splendid army in the world, and be in a position to snap her fingers at combined Europe." That is a famous suggestion but, just as we are about to hand ourselves over to the guardianship of the Major- Generals, a peace orator starts up in the House of Com- mons with the Army Estimates of 1834-35 in his hand, and tells us that we are about to throw away our money in the most, foolish manner. A long wrangle follows, but nothing is done. Whether it be the fault of Miles or Brutus it boots not to inquire but practically nothing is dene. Meanwhile some martial demonstration takes place in France, the French colonels want to pillage the Bank of England because a Roman refugee attempts the life of the French Emperor in Paris, or a great military port is inaugurated, or a heavy fire against England and things English is kept up in the French papers for three weeks, and straightway there comes a panic. Help us, Miles, help us, Brutus! Not a bit of it these illustrious people are ready to mourn over us, and deride us, but there is no help in them. Perhaps a French regiment may be paraded next week in the open space between the Athenseum and the Senior United Service Clubs perhaps, on the other hand, the charwomen and boarding-school girls of England would be strong enough to drive the perfidious Gaul into the sea with their mops and knitting needles all we know is that there is a panic. These panics may be wise or silly, they may be the expressions of prudence justly alarmed, or of idiocy aroused to gibbering; but they have been of periodical occurrence. The measures taken by military men and politicians have not been sufficient to allay them. At the same time, it has been felt throughout as a burning shame, that such a nation as England should, even for one moment, stand in fear of the animosity or treachery of any foreign Power, and at length the country resolved to do what it could for itself.

DREADFUL COLLISION IN THE…

ENGLISHMEN, TREMBLE IN YOUR…

!A WAG ON THE VOLUNTEER SMOVEMENT.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.

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LONDON PRODUCE MARKETS.