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CONSUMPTION AND ITS CAUSES.

A WARNING AGAINST DISSIMULATION.…

AMERICAN COPYRIGHT AND LITERARY…

Ilfoallwras Jhttelligenu.

.wtmwji—ilium"" n mm, AMERICAN…

SELF-ESTEEM.

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SELF-ESTEEM. ♦ Wisdom Comes Down Folly Gives Up. Wisdom, I say, Comes Down; for I think there can be little doubt that most men, in order to think rightly of them- selves, must come to think much more humbly of them- selves than they are naturally disposed to do. Few men estimate themselves too lowly. Even people who lack confidence in themselves are not without a great measure of latent self-esteem; and, indeed, it is natural enough that men should rate themselves too high, till experience compels them to Come Down. I am talking of even sensible and worthy men. They know they have worked hard; they know that what they have done has cost them great pains they look with instinct- ive partiality at the results they have accomplished; they are sure these results are good, and they do not know how good till they learn by comparative trial. But when the comparative trial comes, there are few who do not meet their match—few who do not find it needful to Come Down. Perhaps even Shakspeare felt he must Come Down a little, when he looked into one or two of Christopher Marlowe's plays. Clever boys at school, and clever lads at college, naturally think their own little circle of the cleverest boys or lads to contain some of the cleverest fellows ia the world. They know I.e how well they can do many things, and how hard they have worked to do them so well. Of course they w "U have to Come Down, after longer experience of life. It is not that the set who ranked first among their young companions are not clever fellows; but the world is wide, and its population is big, and they will fall in with cleverer fellows sel. It is not that the head boy does not write Greek Iambics well, but it v. go hard but somewhere he v. find some one who will write them better. They are rare exceptions in the race of mankind who, however good they maybe, and however adir rably they may do some one thing, will not some day meet their match-meet their superior, and so have pamfu^.y to Come Down. And, so far as my own ex- perience has gone, I have found that the very, very few, who never meet a Taking Down, who are f rst at school, then first at co"ege, then first in life, seem by God's appointment to have been so happily framed that they could do without it; that to think justly of themselves they did not need to Come Down; toat their modesty anu humility equalled their merit; and that (though not unconscious of their powers and their success) they remained, amid the incense of applause which woild have intoxicated others, unaffected, genial, and un- spoiled.—" Giving Upland Coming Dawn," in Fraser's Magazine.

"THE FIRST GENTLEMAN IN EUROPE."

THE PARIS CATACOMBS.

.. ------.-ENGLAND'S METEOPOLIS.

THE STRUGGLES OF A SELF-TAUGHT…