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HOW THE SPANIARDS AND MOORS…

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HOW THE SPANIARDS AND MOORS FIGHT. The Times' correspondent draws the following parallel between the mode of fighting adopted by the Moors and Spaniards Spaniards are apt to take illustrations from the bull- 'ing, and 1 have heard this army and the Moors com- pared to the bull and the bull-fighter. The Spanish mil stands calm and firm in his African arena, confi- lent of his power to repel and somewhat scornful of lis foe, worsted in many encounters. Forth rides the Moorish toreador, brandishing a red flag, which he hakes hi defiance and provocation, and followed by a warm of long-legged, long-gun-bearing Morisqos, who ooL upon the brown hill side and in their dirty white iaic';s, like lively gentles. "Come on, come on!" he nay be imagined to say as he makes his charger curvet .nd waves his banner on high, while his followers Touch behind bushes and seek supports for their spingardas, and fire ard vituperate. At the sounds of heir hideous yells and of a whistling bullet or two the :ager Spaniard pricks up his ears, paws the ground, ind soon forgets prudent resolves. Like the unrefiect- ng bull, he is not long in losing his temper and accept- ing his enemy's challenge. Forward the skirmishers -'ring up the mountain battery Up with Yergara's harpshooters Where are the rifled four-pounders ? >nd forward they all hurry-the active red-legged ight infantry, with Minie on shoulder, and the tall powerful mules, which the weight of guns and car- iages perched upon their high pack saddles cannot estrain from furious neighing and inconvenient rear- ng, and other antics highly annoying to their conduc- ors, and scarcely to be checked by sharp jerks at the evere iron apparatus affixed to their nose and mouth. battalions move up in support, the field artillery rum- lies in the rear, and lines of cavalry glitter on the lank, waiting an opportunity to charge. And soon the vlinie whistles, and the sharp report of the rifled guns s heard, and the Moriscos, who are not anxious to ;ome to close quarters, knock over a few men by part- ng shots, and scamper off to another position, and ,gain career to and fro, and wave their dirty little flags ,nd howl abuse of the Spaniards, who again, as before, 'ie seduced to follow them up. And thus some miles of rround are gone over, and the enemy doubtless suffers everely, which does not, however, prevent him, when Ie sees the Spaniards retire, from following them and billing and wounding a few more. The telegraph an- 10unces a fresh victory to Madrid, where there is )robably much rejoicing on the occasion; but the next norning the butcher's bill" is added up, and the loss s ascertained, while anything like a gain, either srb- tantial or moral, is sought for in vain. It may be (uestioned whether such expenditure of soldiers' iivez )e justifiable, but under present circumstances it cer- .ainly seems unwise.

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