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IMPERIAL" PARLIAMENT.

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IMPERIAL" PARLIAMENT. In the House of Lords on Friday, Feb. 10, Lord Wodehouse laid the commercial treaty between France and England on the table. Lord Granville, in reply to Lord Normanby, said there had been communications, but not of an official character, be- tween this country and France upon the subject of the an- nexation of Savoy and Nice to France. Lords Grey and Wodehouse having made a few remarks, the subject then dropped. Some conversation ensued in reference to the disturbances at St. George's in the East, and also to the performance of divine service in London theatres, after which their lordships adjourned. THE BUDGET. In the House of Commons, after a variety of questions had been put to and answered by different members of the Go- vernment, in a Committee, upon the Customs Act, the Chancellor of the Exchequer made his financial statement. After some preliminary remarks upon the circumstances which "attracted public attention, especially to the statement of the present year, as an important epoch in our finances, he proceeded to show the results of the finance of the last year observing that circumstances had occurred during the 'latter portion which would materially affect these results,—namely, the expedition to China and the arrange- ments incident to our commercial treaty with France. THE BALANCE SHEET. He should first, he said, state the account apart from those disturbing causes, and how, when these causes came into action, the account was most likely to stand. The total amount of the revenue for the year had been estimated at 69,460,0002., and would give 70,578,0002. The total charge of the year, estimated at 09,270,0002., was,only 68,953,000?., which would have left a surplus income at the end of the year of 1,625,0002. But we had now to provide for the disturbing causes to which he had referred-viz., for the the army 900,0002., for the navy 270,0002., and for the treaty with France about 640,0002. making a total of 1,810,0002., which would place a small sum on the wrong side of the account But unexpected relief had come. An allied and friendly king- dom had paid a debt. Spain had remitted a sum of 500,0002., of which half would come to the credit of the revenue before the 31st of March. There would therefore be a balance of revenue of 1,875",0002. against a charge of 1,810,0002., leaving to the Chancellor of the Exchequer a narrow surplus. He now approached the more difficult part of the subject,—the charge and expenditure for 1860-61. The estimated charges were 70,100,0002., and the estimated income of the coming year, as the law stood, would be in round numbers, 60,700,0001. The total charge being 70,100,0002., there would be an ap- parent deficit of 9,400,0002., and he did not mean to make provision for the payment of Exchequer-bonds in November next. HOW THE DEFICIENCY MIGHT BE PROVIDED FOR. Here, he observed, he might close by a short and simple process for supplying this deficiency, which might be filled up in two modes. The continuance of the duties on tea and sugar at the present rate would yield 2,100,0002., and the income-tax, at 9d. in the pound, 7,672,0002., or, supposing the war duties on tea and sugar were abandoned, to fill up the deficit of 9,400,0002. an income-tax of Is. in the pound would be required, then, it might be asked, what became of his calculations and predictions of 1853 ? But in that year he had reckoned that we should gain by the new taxes, and particularly the succession duty, 2,549,0002., which, with other expected accessions of revenue, entitled him to count upon a sum of 5,959,0001, as nearly as pos- sible the amount of the income-tax at 5d. in the pound. These est' iates had suffered considerable damage by ] wL_:t had since occurred; but this was not the sole 7 real cause. The succession duty had failed to product. he expected by 1,000,0002. Beside this, the stoppage application of a surplus of ie venue to the reduction of th debt ci nsed an increase of charge, and additional lebt Ind been contracted on account of the Russian war, "'•ems amounting to 2,720,0002., though the revenue had pernu, My increased. The actual charge in 1853 was 58,983,0C: which would havp left a surplus of revenue in 1860-61 of 2,317,0002., had th3 expenditure remained as it was. In 1853 the whole amount voted for-supplies was 24 279,0002. in 1861 it wor-id be 39,200,0002.; an increase of'l4 921 0002., while the i^oome-tax returns under Schedules A B and D showed the increase in the wealth, of the coun- try beyond the ratio of expenditure. He then called upon the Committee to consider the 1 est means of filling up the deficit of 9,40<\oow-> and the principles and policy which ou"-ht to be adopted. He trusted, he said, that th^ expenditure might be reduced by degrees, for mis was a process which was necessarily gradual, or the evil would be aggravated. At this epoch it was the view of the Government that i:. the duty of Parliament to make ccr-T.c stop forward in the career 01 public improvement, and he coulet no;, rdacc "uty on .arrow ground. The House must take it to* granted that we W8re likely to remain on a high level of public expenditure bat this was no reason for stopping in the process of commercial reforms. He pointed out the "essential connect between taxes or trade and in- dustry and the power to pay taxe", and showed the effect of a remission of taxation in the increase in th > amount of taxes that the Customs and Excise grew fast under the remission of taxes than when nothing at all was remitted A BROAD VIEW OF TAXATION FOR THE WORKING CLASSES. Then, upon what principle ought remission of taxes to be baseü 0 fie thou z1 t the bulk of the burden should fall upon the rich, hut t.iat other classes ought to bear theirproper share. It was a mistake to suppose that the best way to give to the labouring classes the yYKtxwyviiTYi of benefit-was to re- duce the duties on such articles as tea and sugar the most effectual relief was by remissions that operated upon the trades which gave *fm em. :cyn.enf T- r ^ed the House to renew the duties on those artic. the,} lod, foi another year. THE NEW TREATY WITH FRAft i„ii. Mr. Gladstone then addressed himself to the Commercial Treaty with France, the stipulations of which, the principles upon which it was based, and its results as they affected the trade and commerce of England, he expounded at great length. He repelled with much energy the charge of sub- serviency to France, asserting that, with an insignificant exception, we had given by the treaty nothing to France. He knew, he said, that a treaty with that country must bear a political character every commercial treaty with France bore such a character. The reduction of duties under the treaty would afford a total relief to the Gonsumer in this country of 1,737,0002., and a loss to the revenue of 1,190,0002. It had been objected to the treaty, he said, that the duties we repealed were revenue duties, laid upon luxuries, which did not affect the poor man but he showed that not one of the duties deserved that character. He contended that what we had done by the treaty was good for ourselves, if France had done nothing at all. Although wine was a rich man's luxury, so was tea in 1760, and both tea and sugar might now be made luxuries of the rich if duties enough were,imposed upon them The wine duties were duties of protection, differential, not revenue duties. CUSTOMS' REFORM AND NEW DUTIES. Mr. Gladstone then proceeded to develope a supple- mentary measure of Customs' reform, which would, he thought, effect a relief to the consumer to the amount of 1,040,0002., and a loss to the revenue of 910,0002., and he pro- posed to meet this loss by certain impositions on trade. This second portion of Customs' reforms consisted in the abolition and reduction of duties on various articles, a list of which he read, and the changes were to be met by an extension of a very small penny taxation, in the shape of registration dues upon goods imported and exported; a moderate charge on certain operations performed in warehouses—bottling, vatting, mixing, &c., which had grown up as an excrescence upon the warehousing system; and this would afford the means of solving a very difficult question,-that of inland bonding, He proposed to levy a duty of 6s. per cwt. upon chicory or other vegetable matter mixed with coffee, which would entail an Excise charge upon home-grown chicory. These charges would bring 510,0002. Other minpr charges upon dock warrants, licenses to eating-houses to sell wine and beer, an alteration of the duty on game certificates, the removal of the exemption from stamp duties on certain cheques, and other small items, would yield 386,0002., making, together with 510,0002., a revenue of 896,0001. There would be a saving in the Customs' establishment of 50,0002., and in the Inland Department of 36,0002., making an aggregate amount of 982,0002., which would more than replace the revenue with- drawn by the reforms. REMISSION OF THE PAPER DUTY. Still he estimated about 1,000,0002. of remission was due to the trade of the country and as the Govern- ment did not think a return to the minimum duties upon tea and sugar was the direction which relief ought to take, he proposed to abolish the Excise duty upon paper, one reason for which was that this duty had been condemned by the House of Commons with the full concurrence of the Executive of the day. The repeal of this duty would simpify the labours of the revenue officers, and it would be accom- panied by the abolition of the impressed stamp on newspapers, and the introduction of an intermediate l^d. postage-stamp. He proposed to alter the system of hop credits, and to reduce the duty on hops and malt. THE rfccOME-lfe AGAIN" INCREASED Mr. Gladstone then brought into one view the results ot these changes, which left a total loss of 2,108,0002., with a total relief to the consumer of 3 931,0002. The total charge for 1860-H being 70,100,0002., and the revenue 60,692,0001., there was still a deficiency of 9,408,0002. To meet this he proposed to continue the Income-tax at a higher rate by Id. than if there was no remission—namely, lOd. in the pound on incomes above 1502., and 7d. on incomes below that sum; the tax to continue with the tea and sugar duties, for one year. This would supply 8,472,0001., making, with the malt and hop credits, 9,872,0002., increas- ing the aggregate revenue to 70,564,0002., leaving an esti- mated apparent surplus revenue of 464,0002. Mr. Gladstone concluded an eloquent peroration by placing a resolution in the hands of the Chairman, and proposing that the con- sideration of the subject should be resumed on Thursday next. Mr. Disraeli thought this proposition unreasonable, and suggested that dayfortnight. A discussion ensued, which terminated in an arrangement by which Monday week was substituted for Thursday. The House then went into a Committee of Supply, when Mr. S. Herbert moved a vote to make good the deficiency of certain army grants for the year 1858-59, which, after some discussion, was agreed to. The Attorneys and Solicitors Bill was read a second time. The remaining business having been disposed of, the House adjourned. In the House of Lords on Monday, February 13, the In- dictable Offences (Metropolitan District) Bill was read a second time, after some discussion among the law lords. The object of the Bill is, that no charge shall be tried at the Central Criminal Court without previous investigation before a stipendiary magistrate—in fact, to abolish in the metro- politan districts the grand jury system, which has been stigmatised as the hope of the London thief." Lord Ebury, in presenting a. petition from the Vestry of St. George's-in-the-East, trusted that Parliament would pro- vide some means by which such unseemly disputes between a clergyman and his parishioners might be avoided for the future. The Bishop of Exeter denied that the Rev. Bryan King had acted in opposition to the law on the contrary, he had only fulfilled it. He considered that before a remedy was ap- plied it would be necessary to show that a remedy was wanted. He strongly insisted upon the necessity of putting a stop to the violence of the mob, which otherwise would gather courage from impunity, and finally perhaps be led into ex- cesses similar to those of the Mo-Popery mobs of 1780. The Bishop of London stated that the disturbances in St. George's-in-the-East had ceased, but he was sorry to say that the mode by which that event had been brought about was by the presence of 60 policemen inside the church. After a short conversation the subject dropped. Lord Ebury's motion for a statement of all alterations made in the Book of Common Prayer by the Queen's Printer since Easter, 1859, by whose orders they were made, &c., was then agreed to. Their Lordships then adjourned. In the House of Commons, on the order for going into a Committee of Supply, Mr. B. Cochrane called attention to our relations with China. He did so in a narrative speech, which was clear and very much to the point. Our demands in 1857, he observed, were limited to the fulfilment of the treaty engagements and compensation for British losses; but, unfortunately, in February, 1858, Lord Elgin took a step further, and demanded from the Chinese Government the right to have a British Minister resident at the Court of Pekin. The demand, lie contended, was the cause of all our present difficulties, in- asmuch as it was admitted to be intolerable to the Chinese, and their assent was only extorted from their fears. In order to establish this position, he gave, from the papers laid before the House, a narrative of the transactions preceding the attempt to force the passage of the Peilio, commenting as he proceeded upon the conduct of the several agents, and especially Mr. Bruce, who had incurred, he said, a heavy responsibility, and had not acted in the spirit of a Minister going to ratify a treaty of peace. He took a lenient view of the proceedings of the Chinese authorities, who looked upon our officials, not the British Government, as in fault, and he ridiculed the idea that the Russians had assisted the Chinese as absurd and a bugbear. He cautioned the Government against pursuing any other object in China but a commercial one. He had little hope of anything else but war arising out of the present complication. Lord John Russell and Lord Palmerston also spoke on the same question, both of whom deprecated full discussion at this time on a subject so important. Lord John proceeded to offer a justification for the conduct of Mr. Bruce, dwel- ling upon the difficulties he had to encounter. He thought Mr. Bruce acted according to his instructions. Lord John was not prepared to give up the Treaty because of the defeat sustained at the mouth of the Peiho, and he was prepared to vindicate the honour and dignity of the British Crown. THE NAVY ESTIMATES. Several miscellaneous topics having been disposed of, the Speaker wis allowed to leave the chair, and the House having resolved itself into a Committee of Supply, Lord C. Paget moved the Navy Estimates. He observed that it was abso- lutely necessary that a country like this, with such extended territories and an immense commerce, should maintain a considerable number of ships, and that, supposing every other country should disarm, we should still be under the neces- sity of keeping up a large navy. The navy was now a new creation,—all nations had started fair, and it behoved us, therefore, to make efforts to restore our superiority. In order to give the House an idea of the navies which other nations possessed, he read a list of the French navy, which had 34 ships-of-the-line afloat and five building, 34 fri- gates afloat and 13 building, 5 iron-cased ships building, 17 corvettes afloat and 3 building, besides gunboats and small vessels, making in all 244 steamships; and most of those building might be launched in a few months. Russia had 9 steamships of the line afloat and 9 building, 18 steam frigates afloat and 3 building, 10 steam corvettes afloat and 11 building, and a number of smaller vessels, making 187 steamships afloat and 48 building-a total of 235 vessels. Unlike ourselves, both France and Russia could call out men to man their navies in a few weeks. He then stated the number of steam-vessels we had in commission on the 1st of December last (excluding sailing vessels) at 244, of which number the force at home and in the Mediterranean,. consisted of 27 line-of-battle ships, 14 frigates and corvettes, and 29 sloops and gunboats, in ad- dition to blockships, the number afloat and building, and the number he expected would be launched before the end of the year, including ten line-of-battle ships and 12 frigates. Lord Clarence then went through the several estimates, explaining them very fully, and commenting upon each. On the 10th vote he accounted for the programme of last year of the ships to be built falling short, and stated that it was pro- posed to build 39,934 tons during the ensuing financial year, besides converting four line-of-battle ships and four frigates. He claimed credit for effecting a real reduction in the vote for naval stores, &c., in the yards, without prejudice to the public service. In conclusion, he said it was with extreme pain he was instrumental in asking for such large sums of money, but it was the wish of the nation that our navy should be maintained in sufficient force and he referred to the suggestion of Mr. Cobden that where the French had two ships we should have three. The Government felt bound, therefore, to continue their exertions to put our navy on a sound footing. At the same time, although these large estimates were asked for, they did not think themselves under an obligation, if the state of Europe and the world should justify a reduction of our naval force, although the House of Commons granted the money, to expend it. He moved the first vote of 85,500 men and boys in the fleet and Coastguard service, including 18,000 Marines. Sir J. Pakington expressed his satisfaction at the state- ment of Lord Clarence, and, after some discussion, the vote was agreed to, as well as a vote of 3,476,7571. for wages of seamen and marines, and another of 1,458,0871. for victuals for the same. The report of the Committee of Supply was brought up and agreed to. The Probate and Administration (India) Bill was read a. third time and passed. The report upon the Customs' Acts was brought up and agreed to. The other orders were then disposed of, and the House adjourned. In the House of Lords on Tuesday, February 14th, a great number of petitions were presented against church rates. Lord Malmesbury called attention to a statement in another place that Mr. Bruce had acted pursuant to instructions in forcing the passage of the Peiho. He had the greatest re- spect for Mr. Bruce, but at the same time he could not let the statement pass unchallenged; and he gave notice that on Tuesday, the 21st, he should call attention to Chinese affairs. The Court of Chancery Bill passed through committee. The Marquis of Normanby moved for "copies of any instructions that may have been sent from the Secretary of State to the Charge d'Affaires at Florence, directing him to attend the official reception, on the 1st of January, of Signor Buoncompagni, now acting as Governor Gene- ral of Tuscany, having been nominated as such by Prince Carignan, of Savoy, without an ysutfsequent popular sanction on the part of the Tuscan people, and also for re- turns of all the dates of all communications between the Secretary of State and his Majesty's ambassador at Paris on the subject of the annexation of Savoy and Nice to France, up to the 1st of January last. The noble lord animad- verted severely on the agitation by which the Sardinian governors of the States of Central Italy had been appointed. He reviewed the late events in Italy at some length, con- sidering the policy which had been adopted towards the Central States. He endeavoured to show that it was a mis- take to suppose that the people had tranquilly submitted to the provisional government. Lord Granville defended Signor Buoncompagni and the Italian people from the attacks of Lord Normanby. The state of Italy was at the present moment most satisfactory, and he thought that the moderation the Italians had ex- hibited was highly creditable. Lord Malmesbury hoped that nothing would induce Govern. ment to abandon the policy of non-intervention. Lord Cardigan said that while it was most desirable that the French army should be withdrawn from Northern Italy, the withdrawal of the French army from Rome would be followed by the most dreadful consequences to the Papal Government and its supporters. Lord Derby asked whether the papers to be laid on the table of the House would contain the latest information on the subject of the negotiations, and whether Lord Granville would point out in what view Her Majesty's Government regard the project. Lords Clanricarde and Granville having made some obser- vations, a desultory conversation ensued, and the motions being ultimately agreed to, their lordships adjourned. In the House of Commons, after some private bills had been read a second time, Mr. Kinglake postponed his motion in reference to Savoy and Nice until that day fortnight. Mr. Berkeley gave notice that as soon as possible after the introduction of the Reform Bill, he would move for leave to bring in a bill to protect Parliamentary voters by the ballot. Mr. Edwin James asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs to what period he intended to postpone the introduc- tion of the Bill for Reform of the Representation of the People in Parliament. Lord J. Russell said he should take his chance for the ballot on Thursday, March 1st. If he should obtain a good place he would bring in his bill on that day. If not, he would bring it in on Friday, the 2nd, or Monday, the 5th of March. Lord Claude Hamilton asked the Secretary to the Ad- miralty whether the attention of the Board had been directed to the quality of the wine and drugs supplied to the navy for medical purposes, it having been described as unfit for the use of invalids, although exempt from duty. Lord C. Paget said that the drugs supplied to the navy were of the best possible character. No complaints had been made about the wine. The statement of the Chancellor of the Exchequer the other evening had caustd some little sensation at the Admiralty, and inquiries were being insti- tuted. Mr. Spooner moved "that this House do resolve itself into a committee to consider the acts for the endowment of the College of Maynooth with a view to the withdrawal of any en- dowment out of the Consolidated Fund, due regard being had to vested rights and interests." He contended that the grant to Maynooth was a great national sin, and that this country was now reaping the fruits of it in the disloyalty which the Roman Catholics of Ireland were exhibiting towards the British Crown. Mr. R. Long seconded the motion, and after some remarks from Mr. O'Brien and Mr. Henessy, Mr. Cardwell, in a very few words, urged the inexpediency of disturbing an arrange- ment so long made, and unsettling religious institutions in Ireland. Mr. ITewdegate supported the motion, and Mr. Hadfield having essayed in vain to be heard, Mr. Spooner made a short reply, and the House divided, when the motion was negatived by 186 to 128. Mr. Pollard-Urquhart moved an address praying for some alterations in the statutes of Trinity and St. John's Col- leges, Cambridge. Mr. Baines seconded the motion, but after some remarks from Lord Stanley, Mr. Walpole, Mr. Briscoe, and Mr. Newdegate, the motion was withdrawn. Mr. Clive moved for and obtained leave to bring in a bill for the regulation and inspection of mines. Mr. Whiteside obtained leave to bring in a bill to amend the Medical Acts. The report of the Committee of Supply was brought up and agreed to. The House, after some further business, adjourned.

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