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THRIVE.

ABOLITION OF THE GREEK EMBASSIES.

ENTERPRISE of the LONDON,…

GOSSIP ON DRESS.

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GOSSIP ON DRESS. ',Î A FAsiirolf writer in the Queen says: The sailors plaint, that the sun crossed tbs line at an inauspicious moment, and that nothing but wind and storm and chill would be our portion this year until we bad passed the longest day, seems to be being literally fulfilled, and there is something pitifully provoking in the way we stand shivering in our furs, gazing at the tempting shows of summer things in the shop windows which we dare not don. And yet it is curious to note how, by accident, the latest novelties of this season are most suitable to a cold summer; for the charming ginghams, whose varied shades of pink and blue delight so many, are, though as fashionable as ever, last year's introduction but the canvas cloths belong to to-day, and for coolness of look and warmth of feel they deserve especial attention just now. ONE of the prettiest dresses I have yet seen was a combination of plain and brocaded white wool canvas, the underskirt being in long folds of the plain with fans of the brocade let in, whilst the drapery, which waslong, was of the brocade trimmed with the f ashion- able guipure de laine; a large watered-silk sash com- pleted this costume, which the softness of the material rendered particularly attractive. And another cos- tume for an older person in rich tabac canvas, also trimmed with guipure to match, was very effective. Those who once discover that those new materials combine the desirable ends of allowing you to look summery and feel warm on a cold day, will know what an invaluable aid to health fashion has found this year. WHILST I am on the subject of these woollen fabrics, I may mention an opera cloak (I was going to say), on)y it is a modern reading of that word which I am going to describe, which is now being made for a lady who is about to be married, and whose hus- band, although they will go out a great deal, does not possess a carriage. This cloak is long, reaching to the hem of a short evening dress, and is composed of a rich brown shade of brocaded woollen canvas; the lining is of the richest buttercup yellow satin, showing through the canvas, and the effect, either in sunlight or gas, is of glinting gold the trimming around neck and sleeves and down the front is a cascade of brown guipure to match, whilst the effect ia carried out by a judicious intermixture of gold tassels, and both at the neck and waist this novel cloak is tied with gold cord and tassels. The intention, which owes its origin to Palis, is further carried out by n most becoming bonnet to match, so that even when going to parties in a hansom, the wearer will look both neatly and picturesquely attired. IT is odd to notice how, even in dress, there is a certain balance of power, and during the last fort- night, when all the handsomest dresses which have been prepared for this London season have appeared for the first time in public on their wearers, it has struck me curiously that, whilst the prevailing taste for the most exquisite but expensive brocades in gold and silver, and even in seed pearl embroidery give no scope for economy in the dresses of those elders who aspire to fashion, there is a marked tendency to re- duce the amount which it is necessary to spend upon girls, in order to make the best of theiv fair young freshness. Net is much used now, and also tulle, whilst, rising in the scale of expense, gauze and crepe form the chief and most fashionable materials for this season's ball gowns. A young lady is well dressed now if she has a full treble net skirt, whose sole trimming consists of either one large sash, or else a judicious arrangement of long narrow bows and ends on the skirt; and a silk, plush, or moir6 bodice will last out many of these. White is more than ever th9 fashion this year, but in Paris there is a return to yellow, and all shades of this becoming colour are being used there for evening wear. Moires, too, are again the fashion, and one large French firm has for some months past been buying up all the surplus stock of this material, which taste in England has turned against; so I suppose it will be some little time before we re-introduce it here, and J. certainly think its harshness compares unfavourably with the charm- ing new sott silks we now get from Lyons. THE terry velvets and terry silks of to-day aro exquisite, and the soft folds and draperies which they lend themselves to, render them especially adaptable to the present fashion of dress. I saw an exquisite bridal robe the other day, which is being prepared for a wedding early in July; the entire petticoat was of draped terry silk and soft gauze puffings, whilst the bodice and train were to be composed of the richest frise velvet, and the effect was admirable. Now that stamped and fris6 velvet has established its popularity, it is astonishing to what a pitch of perfection the French manufacturers are bringing them. I saw some exquisite specimens from Lyons the other day, the grounds being of the richest coral- pink, pale blue, and buttercup-yellow whilst the elaborate pattern of flowers, in velvet which was partly fris6, partly cut, was white, which gave a depth and richness to the effect that is almost indescribable it. was as if the wind had caused a rose tree to shed its bloom upon the richest satin ground, and one felt it was the perfection of the weaver's art. I HEAR, by the way, that terry silks are being largely used in the Princess Beatrice's trousseau, and no wonder, though I am sorry when any French in- troduction runs so near as this does to Irish poplin for the French understand the art of dyeing to per- fection, and they excel in the shades which are so fashionable now. THE prettiest ball-dress I have seen this season hid the bodice and panels of the richest yellow satin, out- lined with skeleton leaves in terra-cotta filoselle, whilst to carry out the harmonious blending of colour the skirt and draperies for the bodice were of deep terra- cotta net, and the effect was excellent. THE latest novelty, says the Lady's Pictorial, in tho way of parasols consists of handkerchiefs printed with heraldic patterns placed one over the other so that the corners of one square come in between the corners of another. They are also made in squares of ecru with a band of coloured velvet. Another new shape in black satin lined with spangled red is just like the inverted cup of a dwarf campanula blossom. The Battenberg of black silk and lace and velvet is another new and very pretty shape, which will be most acceptable if Phoebus really does cheer us with his rays by-and-bye. At present he seems as far off as if it were February instead of May. ——i^——i—9

CO-OPERATION.'

THE DEATHS OF TWO SHEPHERDS…

1TERRIBLE MURDER BY A MILITIA-SERGEANT.

" FINANCIAL AGENTS."

SIX CHILDREN POISONED AT WANDSWORTH.

IANCIENT MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS…

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THE DISTURBANCE AT A WORKINGI…

MISS TAYLOR ON HER PARLIAMENTARY…

MEASUREMENT OF SEA WAVES.

THE QUESTION OF POSTING PROOFS.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

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THE SALVATION ARMY.

GREAT STRIKE IN THE UNITED…

THE EASTER VOLUNTEER MANOEUVRES.

DEATH OF AN AUSTRIAN POET…

THE MARKETS.

SUICIDE OF A LUTON MERCHANT.

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lltisallaimras Intelligence