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THE FRENCH DERBY.

LIGHT OUT OF DARKNESS.

THE WAR BETWEEN BONNY AND…

THE NEW EDDYSTONE LIGHTHOUSE.

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THE NEW EDDYSTONE LIGHTHOUSE. The ceremony of lighting up the new Eddystone lighthouse was successfully accomplished on Thursday in last week under the most favourable possible con- ditions. The Duke of Edinburgh left Paddington by special train at four o'clock in the morning, and reached Plymouth shortly before ten. His Royal Highness then embarked on board the Trinity yacht Qalutea and proceeded to the lighthouse, accompanied by Admiral Sir Richard Collinson, Captain Atkins, Mr. Douglass, nen., Mr. Douglass, jun., ai^d some of the Eider Brethren of the Trinity House. The Galatea was attended by the men-of-war stationed at Plymouth. The ceremony had the advantages of a quiet sea and a cloualess sky. On reaching the lighthouse, his Royal Highness minutely inspected the building, and then, after a I prayer from the Rev. Dr. Wilkinson, lighted-the lamps and declared the building open, afterwards re- cording the fact in the visitors' book at the light- house. On the return of the Galatea to Plymouth, two American men-of-war which were lying in the har- bour, the Portsmouth, and the Saratoga, and which were gaily dressed with colours, manned yards as she passed; on which the Duke steamed round and in- spected them. On his disembarking at the Great Western Docks the Mayor and Corporation of Plymouth presented an address to the Duke, to which he returned a gracious reply, and a procession was then formed to the Town- hall, where a luncheon was provided. The usual loyal toasts, the healths of the Corporation and of the Trinity House, were duly honoured. The Duke of Edinburgh, in response to the toast of his health, as Master of the Trinity House, said I am immensely gratified to find myself here re- ceiving your hospitality in your magnificent Guild- hall—a building which I now see for the first time, and which was opened by your High Steward, the Prince of Wales, who, I know, would have been most gratified could he have been here to-day to take part m the ceremony of lighting up the new Eddy- stone tower. (Cheers.) But he has so many other duties to attend to in London that it was im- fossible for him to come down on this occasion, likewise thank you much, Mr. Mayor, for what you have said with regard to the Duchess of Edinburgh. (Cheers.) I can assure you that it would have given her much pleasure to have been here to-day, but the rapid journey to and from London in one day, combined with the uncertainty of the weather, prevented her from coming down. I hope on some future occasion that she will be able to come among you. The ceremony which took place to-day marked the completion of a great work (cheers)—one which has become necessary through the gradual decay of the rock upon which the great work of Smea- ton was erected. That tower, which for over one hun- dred and twenty years has continued its career of use- fulness, and which is as solid in itself now as it was on the day it was built, kaa been necessarily replaced by another. This work that we celebrate to-day is one waich has been accomplished with the aid of all the advantages which modern science has been able to place at the command of those who have been engaged on this task and it is remarkable that we are able to congratulate ourselves that this work has been com- pleted in a period shorter by 18 months than the time which it was expected that the beacon would have occupied in erection. (Cheers.) I can only hope that the tower of the lighthouse which has this day been formally dedicated to its beneficent purpose will prove as useful as, and even more useful, than the one which preceded it in its mission on behalf of the ships and oommerce ofthe world. (Cheers.) I am glad it has been in my power, and that I should have been enabled by virtue of the office I hold as Master of the Trinity-house, to be present on this occasion and as. sist in such an interesting ceremonial. I beg to thank you once more for the way in which you have drank the health of the Trinity Brethren, and more particu- larly for the way in which you have associated my name with the toast. (Loud cheers.) The Duke then proposed The American Navy in highly complimentary terms. Commodore S. B. Luce, in command of the squadron, responded there were also present Commander W. B. Hoft, of the Portsmouth, Commander H. C. Taylor, of the Saratoga, and Flag. Lieutenant A. Ward. The toast of the Mayor and Corporation was then proposed by Mr. Macliver, M.P., and the proceedings terminated. Among the naval and other visitors there was but one opinion of the beauty and solidity of the new structure, and Plymouth was en fUe in honour of the II event.

IAMERICAN FORESTS.

A FASHIONABLE VEGETABLE.

!CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

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THE SALVATION ARMY.

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EXECUTION AT NORWICH.

EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

SALMON FISHING.

NOT FORGETTING THE WORKING…

AN ACTIVE INITIATION.

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HARVEST PROSPECTS.

THE LOSS OF AN ENGLISH STEAM…

MR. MUNDELLA ON TEACHERS AND…

A YEAR OF LIFEBOAT WORK.

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THE GUITEAU CASE.

METROPOLITAN CATTLE MARKET.—…

- IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

THE CORONATION OF THE CZAR.

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SANITATION IN THE DAIRY.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.