Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

21 articles on this Page

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.

[No title]

[No title]

AN INTERVIEW WITH CETEWAYO.

SURRENDER OF CETYWAYO'S YOUNGEST…

[No title]

I THE I ENGLISH AGRICULTURAL…

A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT.

DEATH OF JUDGE PACKER.

News
Cite
Share

DEATH OF JUDGE PACKER. The death of Asa Packer, at the age of 73, on May 17, in the city of Philadelphia, has caused profound sorrow and attracted great attention, for his life has pointed out more than any other that has closed in recent years the possibilities of individual growth which exist in the United States. Simply by his own assiduity and foresight, Asa Packer accumulated a fortune of 15,000,000 dole, to 20,000,000 dols. during his lifetime; and though larger fortunes have been made in the States, yet there is perhap", no instance more demon8trative of the potentiality of individual energy—The Correspondent of the Times gives the following outline of Packer's career Packer walked with a knapsack on his back when 17 years old, in 1822, from Connecticut, where he was born, to the forests of the Upper Lehigh River in Pennsylvania, and he became a carpenter and after. wards a canal boatman, No origin could have been more humble or less likely to fashion a man to fill the large part in life that fell to the lot of Asa Packer. With scarcely any sohooling, without any advantages, but, in fact, in spite of many disadvantages in a secluded, rural region, far removed from any large city, but through the exercise of Bound common- sense and a business ability that seemed almost like prescience in the success it produced for every venture, Packer ultimately became almost the sole arbiter of the anthracite coal trade of the Atlantic sea- board, and in this way the indirect ruler of the capital and fortunes of eight or ten huge corporations, whose business was the mining and transporting of coal. Accident, as it were, plaoed him in the region of Pennsylvania, where the bsst anthracite coal was pro- duced and as a boatman he carried coal down the Lehigh canal to market—a trade then in its infancy. He foresaw ita possibilities, and worked them out. He acquired the ownership of coal-lands, and built the Lehigh Valley Railroad to carry the cual to sea- board. At times almost ruined by his ventures, they ultimately worked out successfully, and he died the owner of about one-third of the Btock and debt capital invested in the Lehigh Valley Railroad, which has a total par investment of 52,500,000 dols., and he was also personally the owner of large possessions in coal-mines and coal-lands. He had served in Con. grees and had been a Judge, and he was in former years a wise counsellor of the Democratic party and had been its candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania. He founded the Lehigh University with an endow- ment of 1,000,000 dols., and in it ia given a free educa. tion to young men desiring to enter upon a prac- tical scientific career. But the great fact that will be chit fly remembered about this typical American is the possibilities of life in the United States which his career demonstrates. He recently celebrated his golden wedding at Mauch Chunk, and at it, dis- played among the splendid evidences of fortune, were two or three brightly-scoured copper pots and pans hung on the wall. They were the utensils the newly. married pair had used a half century before, when they first set up housekeeping in the humble cabin of a canal boat, with plenty of youth, health, and hope, but little money. Judge Packer was proud of his origin and career, and always ready to help others up and his death has caused a genuine grief throughout the anthracite coal region."

WOMAN'S WORK.

THE EDUCATION OF DEAF-MUTES.

THE HELIOGRAPH.

THE DEMANDS OF THE TENANT…

A DESTRUCTIVE CYCLONE.

THE LATE WILLIAM FROUDE, F.R.S.

[No title]

A FAMOUS MARE.

Utisallanmts

(our fffnkn Coraspoiitient.

THE ZULU WAR,

MEDICAL TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATION.