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NEW SULTAN AND HIS FAMILY.

IING WEATHER-A WARNING.

AMERICAN EMIGRATION.

- CARRIAGE OF EXPLOSIVES.

iS OF WAR IN THE PHILADELPHIA…

TRADE IN AMERICA.

CHEMISTRY OF VEGETATION.

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CHEMISTRY OF VEGETATION. About the beginning of the present century Theodore de Sauasure proved that the leaves of plants, confined in au atmosphere deprived of carbonic acid, soon began to fade, and would die if they were kept long in such an unfavourable atmosphere. He operated on plants vegetating in water and covered with a glass bell, under which he put a vessel full of lime water, for the purpose of absorbing the carbonic acid emanating from their respiration. M. Corenwinder, having taken up the same subject, last week communicated his results to the Academy of Sciences. On the 25th of April, 1875 he introduced into a tubulated balleon a branch of a* young fig tree, the stem of which measured a centimetre in diameter. This branch had a few leaves not quite expanded, and also some buds. A current of pure air was then uninterruptedly driven through the ball on, in order to carry off the carbonic acid generated during the night as well as by day. The branch was not separated from the trunk of the young fig-tree, which was growing vigorously in a favourable soil. Oa the 6th of June following the leaves that were outside the balloon had acquired their normal development; those on the con- trary that had been totally deprived of carbonic acid had begun to fade, and had remained very small. From this experimont, agreeing with those of Saussure and others it may be concluded that in order to thrive, leaves must absorb carbonic acid through their outer surface. It remained to be seen whether similar results would be obtained in the case of full-grown trees having many branches laden with leave*. The subject selected for experiment was ahorse-chestnut tree about-18 feet high. The extremity of one of its twigs was intro- duced into a balloon as before, and pure air was driven through. The single bud borne by the twig expanded very regularly, emitting carbonic acid duiiag the day. Here it was proved that a full-grown tree not only absorbs carbonic acid by its surface, but also assimi- latea that which circulates in its tissues,—GMignam,

PERMISSIVE BILL DEMONSTRATION…

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THE BREMERHAVEN EXPLOSION.

A BOA CONSTRICTOR IN LONDON.

FRENCH VISITORS AT FOLKESTONE.

NATIONAL LIFEBOAT INSTITUTION.

THE OLD AND THE NEW SULTAN.

THE "COMING GIRL."

THE TRADE IN ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS.

COUNTERFEIT COINING.

GERMAN COAL AND IRON.

LIQUOR SELLING IN NEW YORK.

TREASURE IN FRANCE.

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE MARKETS. -

STEAM TRAM-CARS.