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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

REWARDS FOR SAVING LIFE.

"FIRING" HORSES.

THROWING STONES AT RAILWAY…

MACHINERY AND FOREIGN¡. COMPETITION.

SIR SALAR JUNG,-

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GAINSBOROUGH'S "DUCHESS OF…

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GAINSBOROUGH'S "DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE." The above picture, which bad already become famous for havluz b¡;Bn ",1<1 a few weeks ago for 10,100 guineas ( £ 10,€05), the highest price ever paid at au anclion for a portrait. has been rendered still more so by having been stolen from the gallery in which it had only recently been placed for exhibi- tion known as the New British Institution, Old x>md- street, London.-The Times of Saturday gives the following particulars :— The greatest excitement arose in the neighbourhood when it became known yesterday morning, soon after seven o'clock, that this extraordinary and daring robbery had been committed. The large printed placards in the windows inviting attention to the picture were soon surrounded by little crowds, who read with no small astonishment the written notice that during the night some malicious person had cut the picture from the frame and stolen it. From in- quiries made on the spot it was found that the picture had been very neatly cut from the stretching frame after it had been removed from the gilt frame in which it hung against the wall, near the window above the doorway on the first floor. The stretch- ing frame was seen leaning against a sofa opposite tte now empty gilt frame, and it showed that no unprac. tised hand had operated upon the can vas, as the picture itself had been completely removed, leaving nothing but the clean cut canvas at the eriges on which it had been mounted when lined. The gilt frame had the nails simply bent back and not extracted, so that the thief or thieves lost no time in needlees trouble. The apartment in which the picture was exhibited showed scarcely any marku of what had been done, beyond I siom^ crumplii g of the drapery bung in front of the picture. This room is nut more than 10ft. square, having onlv one window opening into Bond-street, the at her being blocked and covered with cloth hangings likA the walls of the room. A passage opens on to it from the large galiery where the water-colour drawings are hung belonging to Messrs. Agnew. But the one window was found open about two feet, and on examining the lead outside there was dis- tinctly visible the mark of a nailed shoe. This win- dow had no blind to it, consequently if any light bad been used during the work of the thieves it would in all probability have been noticed by the pol cemen in the street, who were aware that no one resided in the house after the doors were closed and the premises left locked up for the night. It appears that a porter was employed by Messrs. Agnew to see to the fastening of the doors, and that the same person was intrusted with the opening of the doors in the morning. As far as is at present known, all the doors were found fastened as they had been left. The window, how- ever, would enable the thief to drop his booty in the shape of a roll of very moderate size into the hands of a confederate, and the opportunity of doing this with- out the observation of tbe police wonld be a matter of tolerably easy accomplishment with the aid of others concerned in the plan. It is conjectured that some one, having entered the exhibition-room as a visitor, contrived to secrete himself in some nart of the premises; but, having succeeded in putting the picture into the hands of the other thief by the window, it is difficult to see how he could himself escape without detection, whether in we Dil':ht by the window or after the place was opened in the morning. There are, however two entrances to the house, one from the street, the other by a side door opening iuto a yard through which persons of various occupations pass to some 8tables and a shoeing f, r .'e. This side door is connected by a narrow and dark passage with the principal entrance from the street, so that a person may contrive to escape being seen here, and quietly slip out when the porter had unlocked the door and gone to attend to any other duty. These matters, however, are in the hands of Mr. bu- perintendent Williamson, of the Police, and the detec- tives and as we learn with his advice Messrs. Agnew have' offered the large reward of £ 1,000 for informa- tion leading to the recovery of the stolen picture, some spaedy intelligence may be looked for. It must be tolerably evident that such a robbery was not con. trived with the view of selling the picture, as that would be a thing next to impossible, and the mere offer of it would b3 certain to bring the thieves to detection ia almost any part of the world. The de- scription of the picture given at the time of the sale and the engraving in the Illustrated News must have made it known far and wide." 7

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FASHIONS AT THE FRENCH DERBY.

THE COMMONS BILL.

CANADIAN IMMIGRATION.

THE WOUNDED IN TIME OF WAR;-

THE FRENCH CONVICT ESTABLISH.…

[No title]

THE SCIENCE OF HEALTH.

BEATEN OFF.

THE PLAGUE.

FLUNKEYIAN A.

THE USE OF TOBACCO.

[No title]

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

CATCHING TRAINS.

THE ATTRACTIONS OF SAUL.

AMERICAN HUMOUR.

THE MARKETS;