Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

21 articles on this Page

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. --..--

DYAGE FROM LIVERPOOL TO NEW…

[No title]

I THE PRINCE'S MENAGERIE.

THE EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY FOR…

[No title]

j AN ADVENTUROUS CAREER.

VISIT OF BRITISH WORKMEN TO…

WRECK STATISTICS.

THE NEWSPAPER PRESS OF THE…

ENGLAND'S DETERMINATION to…

WORDS AND FACTS.

A CHINESE WIDOW.

PAUPERISM.

LADIES' CONFERENCE ON TEMPERANCE.

News
Cite
Share

LADIES' CONFERENCE ON TEM- PERANCE. In London, on Monoav afternoon, a conference of ladies, in connexion with the National Temperance League, was held at the Memorial-hall, Farrligdon-street; Lady Jane Elllce in the ch*ir. In opening the proceedings, Lady Jane Elllce ex- pressed the great interest which she had tak- n for 21 years in the temperance movement, the necessity for which she regretted to say she had observed as each year had gone by. Tbey had still very powerful enemies to contend with, but she believed no one I CJUM ounose them with any chance of nlumate success. S/ie strongly protested against the extraordinary belief in doctors' alcoholic prescr ptions which at present pre- vailed in this country. The following letter was read from Sir Henry Thompson, F.R.C.S. :— 35, Wimpole-street, W., May 7, 1S76. Dear Lady Jane,-In reply to your letter I am quite aatie- fied t,bat fermented liquor of any kind is unnecessary as an article of diet. For the few who may require an hllobitual alcoholic stlmulent it can only be considered as a medicine, and should therefore for them be so regarded. As with many other medicines, however, its employment is apt to be greatly abused, and thus wine or spirit is taken when not in the least degree necessary, often when it is absolutely in- jurious. For people who enjoy tolerable health, but never- theless nud "digestion slow" or "Imperfect," or "the circulation languid "-popular forms of excuse for taking wine —It seems to me more frequently a dangerous snare taan a tolerable remedy. Let us put alcoholic liquor in its proper place-nameJy, among the 50. called "luxuries" of life, not among its" necessaries." I am quite alive to tbe exquisite perfume of a specimen of some rare old vintage; to the agreeable exhilaration which follows a moderate dose of champagne. The fragrance of a fine cigar has charms for many persons lbs soothing effect is often still more enjoyable. It is meless-it Is not wi8e to ignore the existence of these things the best natures have felt their iLfluence, and may perhaps have paid some price for Its enj{)yment. Bllt that !.II exactly the point I want to Insist on—l3on't take your daily wine under any pretext of its <MUng you good. Take it frankly as a luxury, one which nJ8it be paid for by lome persons very lightly, by some at shigh price. but always to be paid for—and mostly some loss of health, or of mental pr¡wer,or 01 calmness of temper, 01' of judgment, Is the price. Now with great. deference to your opinion, I think that at the pre!ent moment euch a view of the sut jsct is one which needs to be considered, and if my mar.ner of explessing it ca-i be of any ute, this letter is heartily at your service—1 have the honour to be, dear Lady Jane, very faithfully yours, HENRY THOMPSON. Mrs. Clayton also read a long letter from Dr. B. W. Richardson. He asserted that it was one of the effects of alcohol to check the natural process of oxidation in the body, and for this reason, as he had experimentally proved, it reduced the animal warmth. The view that alcohol was demanded in order to keep up feeble cir- culation was opposed to reason and to practical know- ledge. He had found by direct experiment that the effect of alcohol was to reduce the muscular fibre. Miss Maria Firth, M.D., and Mrs. Docwra, subse- quently read papers on the subject of alcoholic Liquors in Relation to Health." In the evening a public meet- ing was held in the large hall.

THE FUNERAL OF M. MICHELET.

DOG-BITING CASES

THE MARKETS; --

BNANT RIGHT IN JERSEY.

AN ANCIENT ASTROLABE,

[No title]