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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. --..--

DYAGE FROM LIVERPOOL TO NEW…

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I THE PRINCE'S MENAGERIE.

THE EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY FOR…

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The Standard, in a leader upon the above exhibition remarks :— Ostensibly, the Loan Collection is purely temporary: but unquestionably it has all the appearance of baing the germ of a Selence Museum. The Lords cf the Committee of Coun- cil on Education have already stated their conviction that the development of the educational and certain other depart- ments of the South Kensington Museum, and their enlarge- ment into a museum flomewhat of the nature of the Conser- vatoire dell Arts et Metiers in Paris, would tend to the advancement of ectence and be of great service to the in- dustiial progress of the country. But with proper caution, while expressing a hope that. the Loan Collection might promote the firegoing object, their lordships have guarded themselves age.ir.st committing her Majesty's Government to auy definite scheme. The universal approval with which men of science have greeted this pnjtct is a striking fact, and seems to imply that, in their estimation, the Loan Col'ection is somethiug which the age requires. We call hardly suppose that these parties will be satisfied with anything that is merely tem- porary, or which only comes to pass once in several years. Yet there is much in the present Collection which caiinot possibly remain permanently where it is. Public and private collections have yielded up some of their most precious treasures for a season, and will require their punctual return, probably to be lent again no more. Foreign museums and galleries have been stripped of their scientific gems iu order to benefit the present undertaking, and this country Is largely indebted for such generosity, especially as the foreign lenders had to consider the risk of transit. The In- struments of Galileo, and other scientific relics from abroad, have a peculiar value which almost forbids their exposure to the perils of travel by land and sea. But while much must necessarily be lurrendered again to those who have kindly lent their treasures, there is more than a Uttle which might I be retained, and at all events enough might ba kept to- gether to form the mucleus of a permanent museum. The scientific conferences which are being held in connection with^he Loan Collection are also significant. The highest names in science are associated with these g»therings,and there is no hek of:1ll attentive anóieuee. g is generally under- stood thijt science and industrial pmtuUs are not '11fticieIJ!ly a1'jeJ, iin tb,t E-RUud j, t>-ri u<ly rem-rs in n >111.,tler. The present ro'!«riifl:e;it C-M-ction qj Saie; q-L, A"rH- r.itns, wit" a'l it. ooncomiiant.* "f or .'e;eu. es and J, "e-, may te"d 1('\ kindle a r.a«te wMch, has ""t. bad mu b to f>-ed upnn, l'te new enf 'prise h wi-il launched, fcl-r ,M"j' sty the Q leen has l-i l tbe way by a highly palnSialoll2: and apprei-Ucory v;sit AIpn of Science h,.V8 come forward in a. phalanx to gIve thH un-lettikimt 1111 the aid in tilt-it power, I1nll the Jymls r-f the Ci.m 1Jittee of Council have placf d "Il rt:cof,llheir trianks tor this inval11able !\S8i.itance. Vi-count Sunion has t stifled of his personal knowledge to the extraordwary facrifices ot time and labour which have thm b. en made, and to which the public are indebted for the success of the undertaking, The historic interest which attaches to a large por- tion of the collection will be widely appreciated. The chain of tclentiflc history may ba traced through the tropbir-s of more ttian five centuries, and it i8 a marvel how much of brilliant discovery and variable achievement Is aBscciated with means and appliances inthemeeivesrude andtmpetfetit. Science hiid to btgin with clumsy tools, and her early vic- tories were won with weapons which now seem marvellously rough and blunt. Stephenson's Pulling Lilly," with its rudely-jointed cylinder and awkward gear, shows how fearfully Imperfect were all mechanical resources even at a comparatively recent period. It seems a mystery how GJiUo could ever achieve his astro- nomical discoveries with buch miserable telescope as he managed to make. Now we find ourselves living in an age when instrumeuts are so refined that a beam of light h weighed in tile balances, and mechanlchms are enabled to measure the millionth of an inch. More wondrous still, there appears in the biological section at South Kensington an apparatus tor measuring the velocity of thought. Looking round at the marvellous instruments which science now em- ploys in her investigate ns, the visitor at South Kensington may feel that if he be not himself a man of 8c;euce, there are certain of his contemporaries who possess powers such as almost constitute a separate order of human beings. Men who know how to handle these strange instruments aud turn them to account are virtually endowed with faculties such as the mass of man- kind know nothing about. If with the rude tools of a former age so much was done, what may we venture to expect when the instruments are so refined and elaborated as we see now ? But while there is much in this exhibition to puzzle the ordinary observer, there is much that will please and instruct. The Collection is vast, for the objects are said to be 17,000 in number but the examination of a few will suffice to create new thoughts, and may prepare the way for future intellectual enjoyment, while it is to be hoped that much practical good will be the general result.

j AN ADVENTUROUS CAREER.

VISIT OF BRITISH WORKMEN TO…

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A CHINESE WIDOW.

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AN ANCIENT ASTROLABE,

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