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PARLIAMENT. j

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WHAT ARE WE WITHOUT COAL?

AUSTRALIA AND THE INTERNATIONAL…

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AUSTRALIA AND THE INTERNA- TIONAL EXHIBITION. Visitors to the International Exhibition will this week find an important and highly interesting addition to it in the shape of the Australian annexe. Last winter the Victorian Exhibition was held, under a Royal Commission, at Melbourne, and from that col- lection specimens illustrative of the arts, industry, and physical features of the colonies have been gathered together and brought to South Kensington, under the intelligent direction of Mr. Jjevey, the Secretary to the Royal Commissions for Victoria. The annexe is of goodly proportions, forming an exhibition of itself. The walls are enriched with choice photographs, bringing to our very doors all the famous towns and scenery of the antipodes, thus enabling us the more readily to comprehend the industrial and natural advantages they enjoy. The three oolonits have each an apartment of its own where the rich products of the earth are plentifully displayed, not omitting the curious looking quarts and models of great historic nuzgets. Here we have unmistakable evidence that Australia can supply us with other products quite as useful as wool or gold. Wine and fruit she, perhaps, prefers to keep for home consumption, but she recently sent over Bome rich cargoes of wheat, and it is said Northamptonshire indus- tries are beginning to discover there is nothing like Aus- tralian leather. In pickles and preserves she mav some day compete in the English markets, while the United States must look to it or Australia may be upon their heels in the matter of-cheese and bacon. These will, doubtless, be some of the reflections following a visit to the annexe. Many will already have become familiar with the sight, if not the taste, of Australian meat, and they will be glad to learn when at the Exhibition that Mr. James Harrison, an enterprising Australian g ntleman, is now on his way to this country to arrange for the transport to our shores of the veritable Australian joint, without being first boiled up and compressed into tin cans. At the Victorian Exhibition he exhibited fresh meat frozen and packed as if for a voyage, so that tha refrigerating process may be continued for any required period and the catalogue adds, by this process the hold of a ship can be filled with the careves of sheep and cattle, which are frozen in the act of being stowed. The expense of freezing 500 to s before starting will be £ 100 and of keeping the cargo in a freezing state during a voyage of three months £ 75, or 7s. per ton in all.

PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS.'

THE EMPEROR WILLIAM'S HEALTH.

MR. LOWE ON THE CIVIL SERVICE.I

A REMINISCENCE OF PRESIDENT…

!¡AMERICAN CUTTINGS.

THE MINNESOTA EMIGRANTS

LORD COLCHESTER v. LAW.

A DECEASED WIFE'S SISTER QUESTION;

THE CHESTERFIELD PEERAGE.

PREVENTION BETTER THAN CURE!

THE PLACE TO GO TO IN DEAR…

AN INQUIRY AS TO NEXT OF KIN.

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Pisallaiuous Intelligence,…

THE MARKETS.