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IAL PARLIAMENT.

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L TRAIN AMBULANCE.

.RGEST VINE IN THE WORLD.

THE STATIONERS' COMPANY. T

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CIVIL SERVICE EXPENDITURE.

THE OPENING OF MUSEUMS ON…

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COMMITTEE ON COAL.

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A TRIUMPH IN THE CAUSE OF…

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A TRIUMPH IN THE CAUSE OF < HUMANITY. Commenting on the success which has resulted from Sir Bartle Frere's difficult mlasion, the Daily News of Monday says:- We have this moraing the pleasure of making the welcome announcement that the peraeverance and tact of Sir Bartle Frere have been crowned with success, a Treaty putting an end to the Slave Trade in the do- minions of the Sultan of Zanzibar having been signed on the 5th inst. The famous slave market of Zanzi- bar, so well known from the frequent and vivid descriptions of travellers, was closed on the same day. In good time we sball know the precise character of the influences which have brought about this great triumph of humanity. That they must have been potent may be inferred from the nature of the resistance which the English envoy ori- ginally encountered. When Sir Bartle Frere saw the Sultan of Zanzibar last February he wai received with a profusion of ceremony, but in the end he was told that the abolition of the Slave Trade was not to be thought of. Zanzibar, it was represented, had not recovered from the effects of the recent dreadful hurricane, and could not afford the loss implied in a failure ot its supply of labour. Moreover, slavery was a time honoured institution, sanctioned alike by the Mahometan religion and by ancient customs, the aboli- tion of which would lead to insurrection and disaster. Those who knew most of S-yd Barghash were of opinion that he had in some way been imbued with the notion that Great Britain was not in earnest in this matter. Sir Bartle Frere saw him the day after this refusal, and pointed out the serious consequences that might possibly ensue from his resolution; but the Sultan was not to be moved from his purpose. By some means that exalted personage appears to have been since convinced that he had taken an ill-advised course, and that the isolation in which he had been placed by the subsequent successes of Sir Bartle Frere would give him an unenviable position. At any rate, he has BOW given way at all points. It will be for our country- men now to take advantage of the opportunity open to them to introduce a better system. There is a modern maxim that nothing is really destroyed until it has been replaced. Slavery has been admirably replaced on this same East African coast on the estate of Kokotoni, at the northern end of the island of Zanzibar, where Captain Fraser has, in Sir Bartle Frere's jlldg. ment, solved completely and effectually the labour problems of East Africa. It is encouraging to re- member that our successful Envoy wrote only last February If the Slave Trade were abolished there would be no difficulty in getting Indian and European capital, and nothing is wanted here beyond what has been done, and is done daily, by hundreds of Arabs in Egypt."

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CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

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----.-. LORD DERBY on the…

A BAD BITE-FOR THE ACTOR!

-.1-THE MARKETS.