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IAL PARLIAMENT.

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L TRAIN AMBULANCE.

.RGEST VINE IN THE WORLD.

THE STATIONERS' COMPANY. T

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CIVIL SERVICE EXPENDITURE.

THE OPENING OF MUSEUMS ON…

THE TRADES' GUILD OF LEARNING.

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THE TRADES' GUILD OF LEARNING. A conference took ]n °f the Society of Arts in London, on Saturday, in promotion of a pro- ject which is now assuming something hke shape, for extending the advantages of a university education to the working and middle classes of this country. It is proposed tbat local organizations shall be formed in various towns, and put m communication with a central guild for the purpose of defraying the cost of the at- tendance of duly authorised lecturers sent from the Universites of Oxford and Cambridge, to conduct classes and deliver lectures on subjects such, for ex- amule as Political Economy, English Literature, Force and Motion, Agronomy' Geography, &c. Technical Education is to form a leading department of the scheme. Saturday s conferen e was very fairly at- tended by representative working men in the capacity of delezatea from societies more or lee s numerous and power- ful and the whole day from qlevep in the morning until seven in the evening was occupied in the discussion o?the project. Mr. Samuel Morley, M P., presided for the first few hours and was succeeded in the chair by Mr. Mundella, M.P. With them were the Rev. H Solly who is taking a leading part in the promotion of "the movement Mr._ James Stuart, M.A., hon. sec. to the Syndicate, who is actively engaged in furthering the scheme ip connection with the Universities Mr. Webster, Q.C., several reverend gentlemen, and a few ladies. Representatives were in attendance from the follow- ing bodies:—Workrng Men's Club Union, Lord Lyttelton, Messrs. V amdttart Neale, Joseph Newton, Thomas Paterson, Hodgson Pratt, G-. f1?' from St. John's Club, Hoib >rn, Mr. Trades Union Association, Nottingham, Mr. AJbtvri Richards; Alliance Cabinet-makers, Messrs. J. R. Smith, H. D. Rawlings; Working Men's Club ard Maidstone Trades' Council, Mr. John Potter; Uni- versity College, Working Men's College—Professor Clifford, M. A., C. Moseley, and Agricultural La bourers' Union, Mr. Joseph Arch. There wera also present Mr. G. J. Ho'yoake, who was sent to repre- sent the Co-opera1 ive News Company of Manchester and Newcastle Mr. George Odger, Mr. Lucraft, and several other generally representative men. Letters were read from Mr. Twining, Twickenham; Dr. Baxter Langley, and others, and it appears from the public circular of the Guild that favourable re- cognition of the scheme has been given, among others, by Lord Edmont Fitzmaurice, M.P., Sir Antoni,) Brady, Mr. A Brogden, M.P., Mr. J. Dodds, M.P., Mr. T. Hughes, M P., Mr. M'Arthur. M.P., Mr. Whitwell, M.P., the Lord Mayor, Lord George Hamilton, M.P., Mr. Cowper-Temple, M.P., Sir John Bennett, Rev. Canon Robinson, M.A., Mr. James Hole, Mr. Joseph Newton, C.E. In the course of discussion, which necessarily ex- tended over a very wide range, Mr. Morley, while be- lieving that the advantages of university education should be extended to the middle as well as the working classes, expressed himself not unconscious of the danger there is in the political future, unless those who will then be the stronger power in the State duly qualify themselves for the high duties that rest upon them. Therefore, he w"s glad to see that so large a number of working men had given attention to a move- ment which, not merely from a personal but also from a patriotic point of view, would be of incalculable value. He felt sure the scheme would be successful. Mr. Solly, Mr. Holyoake, and Mr. Hay, one of the working-men representatives, followed. Mr. Hay spoke strongly against the practice of engagements to io piece work," a system which he believed tended bo deteriorate the productions of English artisans. Mr. Allen trusted the effect of this schtme would not be, through instruction of technical education, to make known the secrets of British manufactures to all mankind. Mr. Richards said they had com- menced at Nottingham, Derby, and Leicester, and were determined to go on with this movement. Mr. Franklin feared the want of sympathy between the middle and working classes would render it difficult for them to meet together. Mrs. Lewis, possessing some knowledge of foreign workmen, and especially of Ger- mans, gave credit to English artisans for more know- ledge and political power, and attributed any superi- ority the foreigner might possess in technical education and mental culture to the superior advantages they en- joy for cultivation in these respects. Mr. Potter, of Maidstone, complimented the lady on having hit the right nail on the head. Mr. Watkinson, secretary of the Iron Ship-builders' Society, approved of the scheme. Mr. Stuart explained the objects to be, to give both technical and higher education; and al- though there was a distinction between the two, each to a great extent involved the other for while tech- nical education must be made the means of getting money and of bettering the material condition of the working classes, higher education was the means of putting ihem into such a position that their opinion would be of more value, and would, in fact, elevate the In into a higher sphere of life. Canon Ridgway, principal of the Training College, Culham, defended the clergy against charges brought against them that they had not taken the interest they ought to have taken in promoting education. It was moved by Mr. Savage, diesinker. seconded by Mr. Rawlings, cabinet maker, supported by Mr. King, treasurer of the London Trades Council, and resolved, That a trades guild of learning be now established, and the persons present pledge themselves to give it the best sup- port in their power.' Mr. Beadsall, secretary of the London Mechanics' Institute Union, spoke of the advantages of free lec- tures given to working men in Paris. Mr. Morley, reviewing the debate, pointed out that the relations between capital and labour were mutual, and any un- reasonable contention between them would damage both. Working men were now sharing more than ever in the prosperity of the country, and if they would keep down the animal and tram the mental faculties they would become a great power. On the motion of Mr. Hodgson Pratt, a vote of thanks was given to Mr. Morley for presiding. Discussion of details occupied the whole of the after- noon sitting, under the presidency of Mr. Mundella, and was joined in by Mr. Weston, Mr. Dodds, Mr. Vau-ittart Neale, Mr. Middleton, Mr. Hodgson Pratt, Mr. Lucraft, Lord Lyttelton, Mr. Webster, Mr. Franklin, Rev. Mr. Verney, Mrs. Lewis, Mr! Camuin, Mr. Stuart, Mr. Buckmasttr, of South Kensington, and several other speakers. It was agreed that women snould not be excluded from the advan- tages of the guild.

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