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BsX 1,0:10011 CfiVttSJfOllklti

THE HARVEST ON THE CONTINENT

BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

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BEHIND THE CURTAIN. At the Worship-street police court, in London, David Broum, a young roan, emplojed at the Peerless Saw Mill?, was charged on a summons with having unlawfully converted to his own use a number of bendit cirda, entrusted to him by Charles Cripps, to be sold for bis use and benefit. The complainant said that he was a retired licensed victualler, and in March last be had what is known as a ticket benefit at the Standard Tneitre. The defendant wanted to perform on the stage by riding a bicycle, and in consideration of being allowed to do so he would ssll five pounds' worth of tickets for him. complainant. At first witness did not give his consent because he did not know if Mr. Douglass, the proprie- tor of the theatre, would allow it, but eventually the matter was agreed on, and the defendant had the tickets. Afterwards, when applied to for the money produced by the tickets, witness was put off by various excuses, and finding that he C3uld not get it, he brought an action in the Shoreditch County Court. There the defendant pleaded infancy and a set off, alleging that he had been put to expenses in selling the tickets, and in oiber mat'ers. The verdict went for the defendant on his first plea, and these proceedings were taken. III cross-examination complainant said that his benefit which occupied two nights, was a compliment- ary one. The bill produced was one of those he had posted. Mr. Cooke (for the defendant) And in i", I see these words, Mr. Cripps begs to announce that he has engaged, at great expense, the world-renowned Mons. Vernon Dividas, two nights only."—That refers to this young man (the defendant), does it not ?— Com- plainant Yes, sir. Aud did he perform ?—I was cot Ihere the second night, sir hut be did the fir-t night, and fell over. The Magistrate: Was that advertised? — Com- plainant No, sir (laughter). Mr. Cook One of the pieces, you performed was the play of Formosa, was it not ?—Complainant: Yes, sir. And was he not put to some expense in getting a dress for riding in ?—No it was lent to him by Mr. Douglass, and the property-m*n is here to prove it. Well, then, it was one of the dresses—white trouser-i jicket, aiid 8traw bat-worn hy one of the Oxford crew in Formosa, eh?—No. The dress he wore wai used in last year's pantomime. I would not at first give him permission to ride, because I did not know what he could do until I saw him practise behind the saw-mill. The Magistrate: Was he better there than he was behind the curtain.—Complainant Yes, sir. Mr. Cdoke: But did he perform the second night?— Complainant: You ought to know, sir, I was not there. He fell over the first night. The Mngistrate: Then the "great expense" came topmash ? Mr. Abbott (for the plaintiff) That, of course, was all puff, sir, hut it has turned out true for my client. He could not fight the case on its merits. The Magistrate You take these proceedings under the Fraudulent Trustees Act, and by the section I see tha: after civil proceeoinss have been taken to recover money it is nscesfary, before instituting a criminal pro- secution, tha.t the consent of her Majesty's Attorney or Solicitor General, and also that of the judge who tried the civil cause, should be obtained. Has that been done? Mr. Abbott: I was not engaged in the action, sir but my client tells me that the judge of the county court told him to come here. The Magistrate That will not do. To the defen- dant Don't you go riding a bicycle again. Go away now. The summons was then dismissed. Mr. Cooke applied for costs, which were refused.

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