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A FLOATING TOMB.

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A PRACTICAL SUGGESTION FOR…

PLANS FOR OBTAINING A DINNER…

THE SPEAKERSHIP OF THE HOUSE…

PERILOUS AND FATAL ADVENTURE…

THE SOLE REMEDY.

A MODERN HERMIT.

CATTLE FROM URUGUAY.

DEPUTATION TO THE ARCHBISHOP…

THE CATTLE PLAGUE.

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From a Barrister in London. Unless we can find out what the cattle plague is we shall never find a remedy for it. If it be not the plague of Athens it certainly has many things in common with it. In order that medical men may reflect upon this suggestion I send you the account of it, as given by Thucydides, who, as heinforms us, was sick of it himself," and now many others are afflicted with it:— "The Peloponesians (says he) and their allies, who had made an incursion into Attica, with two-thirds of their forces, had not been many days there before a sickness began first to appear amongst the Athenians such as was reported to have raged before this in other parts, as about Lemnos and other places. Yet a plague so great as this and so dreadful a mortality in human memory could not be paralleled. The physicians at first could administer no relief, through utter ignorance; nay, they died the fastest, the closer thei- attendance on the sick, and all human art was totally unavailing. Whatever supplications were offered in the temples, whatever recourse to oracles and religious rites, all were insignificant; at last expedients of this nature they totally relinquished, overpowered by calamity. It broke out first, as it is said, in that part of JEthiopia which borders upon Egypt; it afterwards spread into Egypt and Lybia, and at length on a sudden fell on the city of the Athenians. The contagion showed itself first in Piraeus, which occasioned a report that the Pelopon- nesians had caused poison to be thrown into the wells, for as yet there were no fountains there. After this it spread into the upper city, and then the mortality very much in- creased. Let every one, physician or not, freely declare his own sentiments about it; let him assign any credible account of its rise, or the causes strong enough in his opinion to intro- duce so terrible a scene. I shall onty relate what it actually was; and as, from an information on all its symptoms, none may be quite at a loss about it, if ever it should happen again, I shall give an exact detail of them; having been sick Oi it myself, and seen many others afflicted with it. This very year (B.C. 4.3u), as is universally allowed, h ad been more than any other remarkably free from common dis- orders or, whatever diseases had already seized the body, they ended at length in this. But those who enjoyed the most perfect health were suddenly, without any apparent cause, seized at first with headaches, extremely violent, with inflammations and fiery redness in the eyes. Within, the tongue and throat began instantly to be red as blood the breate was drawn with difficulty, and had a noisome smell The symptoms that succeeded these were sneezing and hoarseness and not long after the malady descended to the breast, with a violent cough but when once settled in the stomach it excited vomitings, in which was thrown up all that matter physicians call discharges of bile, at- tended with excessive torture. A great part of the in- fected were subject to such violent hiccups, without any discharge, as brought upon them a strong convulsion, to some but of a short, to others, of a very long continuance. The body, to the outward touch, was neither exceedingly hot nor of a pallid hue, but reddish, livid, marked all over with little pustules and sores; yet, inwardly, it was scorched with such excessive heat that it would not bear the slightest covering or the finest linen upon it, but must be left quite naked. They longed for nothing so much as to be plunging into cold water, and many of those who were not pro- perly attended threw themselves into wells, hurried by a thirst not to be extinguished, and whether they drank much or little their torment still continued the same. The restlessness of their bodies, and an utter inability of composing themselves by sleep, never abated for a moment and the body, so long as the dis- temper continued in its height, had no visible waste, but withstood its rage to a miracle, so that most of them perished within nine or seven days, by the heat that scorched their vitals, though their strength was not ex- hausted; or if they continued longer the distemper fell into the belly, causing violent ulcerations in the bowels, ac- companied with an incessant flux, by which many, reduced to an excessive weakness, were carried off. For the malady, beginning in the head, and settling first there, sunk afterwards gradually down the whole body; anti whoever got safe through all its most dangerous stages, yet the extremities of their bodies still retained the marks of its violence. For it shot down into their privy members, into their fingers and toes, by losing which they escaped with life Some there were who lost their eyes, and some who, being quite recovered had, at once, totally lost all memory and quite forgot, not only their most intimate friends, but even their own selves. For as this dis- temper was in general virulent beyond expression, and its every part more grievous than yet had fallen to the lot of human nature, so, in one particular instance, it appeared to be none of the natural infirmities of man, since the birds and beasts that pray on human flesh either never approached the dead bodies, of which many lay about uninterred, or cer- tainly perished if they ever tasted. One proof of this is the total disappearance then of such birds, for not one was to be seen, either in any other place or about any of ttie carcasses. But the dogs, because of their constant familiarity with man, afforded a more notorious proof of this event." Have we not here the typhus bovilis, and what is erro- neously called the small-pox ?

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THE COURT DRESS QUESTION.

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AN AFFAIR OF HONOUR!"

THE MARKETS.

A FREE AND EASY WAY OF-DOING…