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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. -

THE LOW LODGING-HOUSES OF…

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THE LOW LODGING-HOUSES OF NEW YORK. Some faets presented in the annual report of the Metro- politan Police Commissioners at New York, contained in the me of journals just come to hand, will bear comparison with any of the sad reports that occasionally crop out respecting London, or the narrative of the amateur casual" of the PaU Mall Gazette. We learn from them that in a single precinct in the Fourth Ward:— There are 60 places, or dens, where the wretched poor, the criminals, and the depraved, resort to lodge, paying from 10c. to 15c. per night for the miserable accommodation. The places are chiefly in cellars, with naked stone or brick walls, damp and decayed floors, without beds and bedding fit for human beings. They are mainly unventilated or lighted, except through the entrance door. In condition they are filthy and disgusting beyond description, overflowing with vermin and infested by rats. Into these hideous places are packed nightly an average of ten persons to each place, or 600 in the aggregate. In violation of the laws of decency and morality, men, women, and children, white and black, with no regard to the family relation, sleep promiscuously together, exhibiting less of the impulses of decency than the brute creation. From the character of these apartments, their owners and occupants, and the manner of theirjuse, cleanli- ness is impossible, and hideous diseases of various classes and types are engenered and propagated. While thus occupied they cannot be made decent or healthy, and those who frequent them are beyopd the reach of reform, except through the strong arm of the law. Again, in the Sixth Ward are the following hideous receptacles for human beings:— No. 25, Baxter-street, two rooms, each 10ft. by 6, full 10ft. below the street; no windows or other ven- tilation, bare stone walls, no furniture, a dirty, dis- gusting cave; 12 to 14 lodgers nightly, at 10c. per night. First floor of same premises a drinking place, the resort of thieves, beggars, and prostitutes of the lowest class. The captain says, 1 have seen as lodgers 18 of both sexes asleep in the place during the night." No. 15, Baxter-street, a cellar, 14ft. by 18; five beds; naked stone walls, no window, light, or ventila- tion 14 persons are accommodated at 8c. per night. No. 16, Mulberry-street, one room, 14ft. by 10, with nine beds, and two beds in adjoining kitchen; 20 per- sons, male and female, are lodged at 6c. per night. The building is the property of an officer of one of our city banks, and rents for 61. per month. No. 51, Baxter-street, second floor, one room, 8ft. by 5, contains three beds, kitchen adjoining several beds on the floor; 18 persons lodge here, at 6c. to 8c. per sight; rent, 71. per month; owned by a well- known citizen in Twenty-third-street. No. 141, Leonard-street, second floor; two rooms, one 8ft. by 10, and kitchen adjoining; eight or ten lodgings, at 8c. per night. Other places are spoken of in the Sixth Ward, where young and old, black and white, thieves and prostitutes, beggars and drunkards, and every kind of abandoned character, herd together, sleeping promis- cuously on the floors, and coming forth in the morn- ing to prey on the community. The captain of the Ward speaks of these places as poisoning the atmos- phere' of the whole neighbourhood, and spreading abroad disease and pestilence."

A PLEA FOR RAILWAY SERVANTS.

A HINT TO REFORMERS.

THE EFFECT OF A "MINISTERIAL…

AN EXTRAORDINARY SWINDLE.

A TURKISH PRINOE!

THE POST-OFFICE.

PROVING HIM DEAD.

THE EARL OF SHAFTESBURY ON…

A HINT.

THE QUEEN AND THE CATTLE PLAGUE.

THE LAW OF TREASURE TROVE.

A SENSATIONAL TELEGRAM.

VACCINATION FOR CATTLE, &c.,…

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SEIZURE OF ARMS IN DUNDALK.…

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THE MARKETS.

ENDOWED GRAMMAR SCHOOLS.

A DARING ESCAPE.

A SPORTSMAN OF THE OLD SCHOOL.