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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. -

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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. AMERICA. NEW YCRK, Jan. 16 The telegraphic news from America has an alarmist cha- racter, but more, we think, on the surface than in reality. Mr. Chandler had moved a resolution in the Senate requesting the President to withdraw the American ambassador from England, and to inaugurate a policy of non-intercourse on the ground of our refusal to settle the Alabama claims. There seems to have been a debate of considerable importance on this motion; but it was ultimately tabled "-that is, re- jected—by a majority of 25 to 12. Mr. Chandler and Mr. Sumner, both wished the resolution" to be referred to the Senate committee for Foreign Affairs but instead of this, the subject was got rid of altogether. Thus far, therefore, the anti-English feeling has been powerless for mischief A resolution has been offered and laid over, recommending the immediate trial of Messrs. Davis and Clay by military commission. All the volunteer troops in the department of lirgil have been mustered out. The report in the American journals that the Federal troops would be withdrawn from Alabama and Georgia was unauthorised. General Grant, in replying to an application for their withdrawal, does not recommend such a step until there is ample security for the protection of all classes in the late rebellious States. He doubts the propriety of arming the militia while the Federals remain in the Seuth. The Federal adjutant in Mississippi has revoked the order disarming the negroes. The Treasury agents in Charleston have arrested the princi- pal officials, and seized the books and assets of several blockade-running companies organised during the war. They have forbidden them to dispose of their assets, and the matter has been referred to Washington for adjudication. The Federal troops have recaptured the steamer Lilly taken by outlaws on the Alabama river. Seventy-five bales of Government cotton had been landed, and the outlaws had expressed their determination to prevent any Govern- ment cotton running on the Alabama river. All government employes at Fort Monroe, formerly in the service of the Co; federate Government, have been dismissed in consequence, it is said, of fears that they intended to at- tempt the rescue ef Mr. Davis. General Sweeny, the Fenian Secretary of War, has joined the senate organisatiou, and has issued a call for prompt military action. In the Senate Mr. Chandler has given notice that he would on some future day read the British Foreign Enlistment Act, With the provision abolishing all existing laws on neutrality. During the debate on the resolution for the proclamation of ncn-intercourse with England, Senator Johnson said that it was a very important matter, and that the mere offering of the resolution had created great solicitude. He moved to table the resolution. Mr- Chandler wished the resolution to be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs. Mr. Sumner thought that a reference to that committee was the best course to pursue. The resolution was then tabled.

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