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THE EAST GLAMORGAN RAILWAY…

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n ADVENTUROUS EXPERIENCES < OF BARRY SAILORS. CAPTURED BY REBELS AT RIO. DEATH OF A PENARTH YOUTH. Captain J. Glazebrook, of the clipper ship Miconesia, of Liverpool, 1,575 tons register, which arrived at Plymouth on Friday last with a cargo of wheat from Melbourne, 112 days out. reported having had a most adventurous voyage on the passage out. The ship was at Rio de Janeiro while the war was going on, and the danger of her posi- tion was accentuated by the fact of her being laden with coal for the Government. She left Barry for Rio and made the run in 37 days. When in lat, 9 N long. 25 W., an apprentice named George Cooper Edmondson, believed to be a native of Penarth, fell overboard and was drowned. The next fatality was in the harbour at Rio, where E. Bird, an able seaman, ventured over the side for a swim, but sank suddenly, and his body was not recovered. When the ship had been about four weeks at Rio, the revolution broke out, and the rebel faction took possession of the Miconesia and towed her to the Nictheroz side of the bay, in order t prevent the Government cruiser getting coal. Jhe ship, however, was towed back to her original position, and the work of discharging re- sumed under conditions of a difficult and highly dangerous character. There was promiscuous firing across the vessel, and while the ballast was being taken in one of the lightermen, a Welshman, named Thomas, was shot through the head. He died whilst being conveyed ashore in the ship's boat. The crew had to seek shelter in the hold during the indiscriminate firing. The ship's side-she is built of steel-was riddled with bullets, and the men were in great fear of shot or shell striking her. Captain Glazebrook and several ladies, one of whom was the wife of Captain Robbins, of the ship Scottish Moor, had a narrow escape of their lives while their boat was sailing across the bay. Three volleys were fired at the boat from shore, and several bullets pierced the gunwale. The mast was also shot away. About a week later a small gun- boat flying the rebel flag came on the quarter of the Micronena for shelter, and crushed one of her boats. Her presence attracted the attention of the Government forces on shore, and they directed fire on her. Therefore, the position of the ship and crew was not an enviable one. Several shots fell on board the Micronesia, and it was only when the rebel gunboat moved away that the firing ceased. Captain Glazebrook had another marvellous escape. He was walking to his boat from the Custom House with one of his seamen, named Lindley, when the latter's head was "shot off." Having managed to get ballast on board, Captain Glazebrook sailed as soon as a favourable wind set in for Melbourne, and he and his crew were heartily, glad to leave Rio. While the ship was being towed down the bay the Micronesia had a parting salute. When abreast of Fort Lage and Santa Cruz the firing was very heavy, and a signal to heave to was heard from the latter fort. Before the ship's way could be stopped a shot from the fort struck the water between the tug and the ship, and then bounded between the fore and main masts. Captain Glazebrook obeyed the signal, and put the ship round, and was towed back. Explana- tions and apologies from the shore authorities fol- lowed. and an amende was made by the authorities granting the ship permission and the password to leave the following day, when the Santa Cruz fort was passed in safety. On the passage to Mel- bourne, and when in lat. 35 S. long. 27 W., an able seaman named Albert Whitley, said to belong to Plymouth, whilst fixing some matting on the chafing gear on the fore lower topsail, fell, and died from his injuries.

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