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" THE CRAFTY TACTICS OF ROME."

THE BATTLE OF LIFE.

PENARTH CONSERVATIVEI CLUB.

GENERAL UNION OF CARPENTERS…

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GENERAL UNION OF CARPEN- TERS k JOINERS, PENARTH. The annual dinner in connection with the members of the Windsor Lodge of the General Union of Carpenters and Joiners was held on Friday evening last at the Ship Hotel. Penarth. There was a large attendance, Mr Jenkin Llewellyn, vice-chairman of the School Board, presiding. There were also present-Messrs Sam Thomas, Johnshon (St. Fagans), R. Beavan, T. S. Lloyd, D. Corn well, L. Molineaux (Barry Dock), C. Tonkin. Captain Gibson, J. Richards, Thorne, T. Northey. W. Harris, J. Sandford, F. Bartlett, J. Stapleford, J. F. Pickford, T. Garrett. J. Stack, k. Escott, T. Griffiths, W. Kennard, T. Coney, T. Ramm, G. Groves, E. Roberts, W. Davies (presi. dent), W.Jeans, J.Evans, W. Smythe, D. Lord, J. Richards (sec.), &-c. Host James provided a, substantial and well-served repast, after which the chairman proposed -'The Queen and Royal Family" and "The Ministers of Religion."—Mr T. S. Lloyd next proposed "The Army, Navy and Auxilliary Forces," coupling with the toast the name of Sergeant-Instructor Tobin, who alluded to the fact that in 1889 he was the best shot in the British Army, in 1890 the best shot in Ireland, and in 1892 he beat the whole army with the revolver. (Applause.) Sergeant Bartlett, R.A., also responded. — Mr Creet, in proposing '• The Town and Trade of Penarth," said he was glad to know that the trade of the town was show- ing a certain amount of improvement. One thing- more than another ministered to the good of the community, and that was good houses, which they could not have without good workmen. (Ap- plause.)—Mr D. Cornwell, in responding, said some of them could remember the time when local trade was worse than it was at present. They should, therefore, take courage. He should be glad to prevent so much of the money earned in Penarth taken out of the town. He induced the Local Board to let the private improvement works in sections so that masons and others of the town might have an opportunity of tendering for the work. He was sorry to say it was not being carried out. and out of the last contract for £ 2,500 scarcely a penny was spent in Penarth, and the town and trade consequently suffered. There was another grievance, namely, that so many trimmers and other workmen were brought there to work when they had their own men standing by idle. All these things had a. tendency to keep Penarth in the background, because it took away the money which should be spent at home. (Hear, hear.)—Mr R. Beavan said he was sorry to differ from Mr Cornwell. The members of the Local Board were all actuated by a. desire to do the best thing they could for the town. The question of letting work in sections was found unworkable upon the ground of finance. The next point, with regard to the employment at the dock of Cardiff trimmers nstead of those from Penarth, even that was unworkable. Every merchant had his own gang of men, and those men followed the merctant's coal to whatever dock necessary, and if that merchant sent his ships to Penarth, Barry, or Cardiff, the men had to follow them.—Mr Sam Thomas also responded, and congratulated the town on the action of the Local Board in adopting the Free Libraries' Act. By so doing the Local Board had conferred a great privilege upon the town. With reference to the work done at the dock, as Mr Beavan had said. they were unable to interfere. Penarth and Barry were free trade ports, and they were utterly powerless to inter- fere. On the other hand, they must recollect that. Penarth men were wanted at Cardiff, and they brought back Cardiff money to Penarth. Many men who worked at Barry lived at Penarth, and spent their money there. The proposed inter- mediate school would be of great advantage to Penarth. He was glad to tell them there was a. prospect of a very good year's work at the dock. (Applause.)—The Chairman having read letters of apology for absence from the chairman of tho Local Board and Mr Jefferies, Mr Thorne proposed Success to the Windsor Lodge." coupling with the toast the name of Mr W. Davies, chairman.— Mr Davies said they were progressing very well, and during the last five years had increased one- third. The advantages accruing from unionism were apparent to everyone, and, as unionists, they should endeavour to get machinery taxed in some way. (Cheers.) They had now fifty or sixty men dut of work in Cardiff owing to the use of machinery, and he thought it time something were done in the way of protection. He was glad to say the two lodges in Penarth were getting more united, and he thought if they continued in the same spirit they would become one in the end. — Mr Elkington pro- posed the toast of Kindred Societies." and MrL. Molineaux. Barry Dock. responded. He had, he said, been connected with trade societies for the past 25 years, and although carrying on business he had always kppt up his connection with his old society. The benefits to be derived from unionism could not be over estimated. (Hear, hear.)-Other toasts followed, and songs were sung by Messrs Tonkin, E. Roberts, Pickford, Sawby. Creet, Lewis, Wheatley, &c.

OFFENCE BY A PENARTH CAPTAIN.

GRAND CONCERT AT PENARTH.

THE ALLEGED ATTEMPT AT PROCURATION…

COAL SHIPMENTS AT PENARTH

CLAIM FROM A PENARTH PRINTER.\

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LOCAL FOOTBALL.

THEFT OF CLOTHING BY A PENARTH…

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