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BARRY PAST AND PRESENT."

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BARRY PAST AND PRESENT." — ♦ [BY FJ.OREAT BARRY."] (Continued from our last imuc.) MERTHYR DOVAN. Damian, or Dyfan (from which patron saint the parish of Merthyr Dovan takes its name, as the ancient chroniclers relate) was sent by St. Et-eutherins to evangelize Britain at the instance of Lucius, king of Morganwg and Gwent. Lucius, or, as the Welsh love to call him, Lleufer Mawr (the great brightness), ruled in the second century, and having heard from some of the few Christian soldiers of the Roman army of occupa- tion of the gospel of Jesus Christ, an(I becoming impressed with the beauty of its teachings, he sent two messengers to Rome, and in response to their appeal Fagan and St. Dyfan wero sent to Britain. The second patron of Merthyr Dovan is St. Teilo, the second Bishop of Llandaff. As the Jsiber Landavensis says This holy man, dearly beloved, was from his infancy a worshipper of <rod, and carried on his warfare by being urgent in prayer, and by giving to the poor whatever he possessed." It is said of St. Teilo that, during a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, in company with Saints Dyfrig, David, and Padarn, he received gifts of tongues, and was eventually consecrated Bishop by the Patriarch. THE CHURCH AT MEttTHYR DOVAN consists of chancel, nave, south porch, and tower at the west end. It is mainly perpendicular work, recently restored. In the south wall of the chancel is one original window, and- the tower lights are small but good. But the chief glory of the sacred edifice is a small early English window at the east end of the north wall of nave. It is a veritable gem, and a study of the moulding would afford a genuine treat to lovers of that period of architecture. Near the porch is the socket of a cross standing upon three grey lichen-covered -steps. This hoary relic of olden piety forms a striking feature in the tiny churphyard, and is an object of wonderment. In the porch is also what is supposed by some to be a holy water stoup. The interior of the phurch contains little of interest besides the font. There are two bells, comparatively modern, in the tower and the registers only date back as far as 1813. The churchyard was formerly much larger than at present, and iustead of only enclosing the south side it lay all around the church, and comprised the field which is now recognised as glebe land. In the churchyard a little westward of the embattled tower is a lovely well. It is nicely paved and covered over, and its limped waters silently glide over the greensward to a little ravine on the north side of the church. It Í!L highly picturesque, and the large ferns hanging over the water add a cool and refreshing-air. Looking once again at THE QUIET LITTLE VILLAGE, j with the picturesque cottages nestling around its gray old church—a vision fair to gaze upon—and remembering that ten years ago the whole parish (and it is rather an extensive one, embracing a considerable portion of what is now known as the Barry Dock district) was truly" far from the madding crowd," the home of only one hundred and three souls, one naturally fears the advance of the inevitable builder, and the thousands of new comers who have already transformed a large portion of the parish into a busy, thriving town- ship, and that old ancestral friendships, old land- 9Barkp, be done away and the place thereof know them no more. CADOXTON-JUXTA-BARRY. Cadoxton is situated seven miles south-west of Cardiff, and derives its name from Cattwg 1)doeth (St. Cadoc the Wise), the founder of its original church. Until recently the place was a typical Welsh village of some three hundred inhabitants, and, withal, they were blessed inasmuch as their undulating lanes and fertile meadows were until comparatively recently undisturbed by the invasion of "Ruskin's terror." Since the opening of the line dock at Barry, however, commerce has here again superseded agriculture, and now Cadoxton parish alone affords accommodation for about 10,000 souls. The growth of the place is certainly extraordinary, and under the various stages of its tlevelopement many minds must have reverted to the mushroom towns of the United States, Stand- ing at the foot of THE FINE OLD COMMON (which now, unfortunately, is being seriously defaced by the cruel hand of so-called 'civilisa- tion "), the mind of the historian naturally becomes crowded with thoughts of the pious and self- denying fifth century monk, St. Cadoo, his religion, and his times. St. Cadoc (or Cattwg), left the parental roof, and settled at Llancarfan (a village in the Vale of Glamorgan) by the guidance of an angel, so the legend runs. Here he erected a monastic college, and was afterwards chosen as councillor by the chieftains of the whole country side, especially by Arthur at Caerlecn, where he founded a church. He was an eminently holy man, and every year as Lent came round he would quit his home at Llancarfan and retire to the Flat Holme Island (between Barry and Penarth), and spent forty days alone with God." Ascending a short incline (from the point of a small street dedicated, I was informed, to the late Lord Iddesleigh), I found myself upon that fine open space, the Common, henceforth, it is hoped, to be the lungs of Cadoxton. From this magnifi- cent vantage ground one obtains superb views of Barry Island and the dack, the latter presenting- quite a, forest of masts. Around one sees the grand and historic Severn Sea—here studded with the Holmes and Sully Isle, there bordered by happy Weston and its captivating environs, the whole bathed in a glorious silver sheen, a pleasant medley of light and shade, constituting a thing of beauty and a joy for ever." On the other side of the Common can be seen THE GREY OLD PARISH CHURCH, nestling within a quiet vale which is, as yet, com- paratively free from the invasion of the brick and mortar merchant. The churchyard is, in spite of the otherwise busy character of the parish, a peaceful inspiring spot, and as one climbs over the farmer's stile," and alights at the foot of a fine old yew, the words of the poet Gray are impressed once more upon even the least sensitive mind— u Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade, I- Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, 11 Each in his narrow bed for ever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep." CADOXTON CHURCH is an exceedingly interesting structure, and con- sists of chancel, Rave, south porch, and western tower, the latter saddle-backed, and containing four bells. Opposite the porch (the principal entrance) is the base of the churchyard cross. As one enters the sacred edifice a fine Norman window (round-headed lancet) is noticed in the north wall. This window really determines the age of the oldest portion of the present fabric, that is, the eleventh century. When the main structure rested. upon the lower portion of the present walls for the iirst time the church was, most undoubtedly, lighted by a series of windows of similar design to the one in question. To the left of the porch doorway can be seen a very interesting Norman font it lack" the leaden lining at present, but the drain, according to older custom, opens not in the centre, but a little towards one side. Towards the west is a fine pointed arch under the tower, and to the north of it is a peculiar memorial tablet bearing a. some- what singular inscription. The tablet in question is erected in memory of one John John (who died in 1794), and runs thus :— Pain was my pleasure, physic was my food, Groans were my devotion, drugs did me no goad "Christ. was my physician, to know the way that's best, To case me of my pain, and act my soul at rest." On the right of the chancel areh is the entrance to the rood loft, and on tho left is a corbel support of the loft, and a window raised high in the wall to light the same. At the late restoration of the building the scant remains of what had once been extensive frescoes were uncovered, but as the greater part of both north and south, walls fell in they were irretrievably lost. The old horse-box yews have been replaced by neat open benches, and altogether the nave presents a. most comfortable appearance. The chancel arch is a rough piece of pointed work, and is only remarkable for its great depth. Beneath the sill of the blocked window on the western side of the doorway in the chancel is a small piscina (the sill itself having been used as the credence.) The present communion table is placed on the site of the old altar, and is raised two steps above the level of the chancel floor. Around the table is an old oak railing and on the higher step, near the gate giving access to the communion table, is a portion of the old altar slab. Near by are parts of this old slab, but the larger portion seems now to be used as a step from the churohyard into the porch. Near the north-west corner of the chancel is a pre-Reformation tombstone, and over the altar space are the tracea of a round Norman window, which is now partly blocked, and slight traces of the window are to be found on the exterior of the eastern wall. The interior roof of the chancel is also of interest. It is wagon-head in design, and in a capital state of preservation. The one most uncommon feature it discloses is the trace of an altar-canopy. It ex- tended to the distance of five ribs from the eastern wall, and rested upon the finely-traced cornices totbe seen on either side, on a level with the wall-plate. On the third rib can still be descried traces of the beading by which the canopy was sustained. I must not linger longer over the charms of this venerable structure whose floor must often have been trodden by Cattwg, its pious patron saint. The registers of the church are numerous, and one parchment sheet is of early sixteenth century date while the communion plate is of the design and date so often noticed in accounts of Glamorgan Churches. On the hill above the church, immediately at the top of Church-lane, and on the spot now marked by a telegraph pole, formerly stood the base of a wayside cross, shaded by an aged yew. It is said that within living memory all funeral processions to the church, from whatever part of the parish they came, always made their way to this cross to lay the corpse at its base. This brings me to the close of the subject from an antecedent, or historical, point of view, and I will next deal with Barry of the Present." (To be continued in our next issue.)'

SAVAGE ASSAULT ON THE POLICE…

ALLEGED EMBEZZLEMENT AT CAD…

ANOTHER ALLEGED OUTRAGE ON…

PUBLIC WORKS AT BARRY AND…

AT CLOSING TIME.

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THE ALLEGED EMBEZZLEMENT AT…

ANOTHER FATAL ACCIDENT AT…

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I SUNDAY DRINKING AT I PENARTH.

ECHOES FROM BARRY DOCK | POLICE…

| SPECIAL MEETING OF THE j…

MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT BARRY…