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.--..---CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH…

PENARTE POLICE COURT.

THE SEVERE WEATHER.

CORRESPONDENCE.

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FOOTBALL.

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FUNNIOSITIES.

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MR. GLADSTONE ON THE "ENGLISH…

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MR. GLADSTONE ON THE "ENGLISH It ACE" WHAT HE THINKS OF IT. Mr. Gladstone on the English RiCe" (says the Chraniclr) is the shortest possible description of a pretty long letter which the G.O.M. has written to an American author. The work which drew forth this letter is published here by Messrs. Osgood and Mcllvaine, and is entitled "The Puritan in Holland, England, and America." For eub-title, the author, Mr. Douglas Campbell, a well known New York lawyer, calls it An Introduction to American History." At the out- set, Mr. Gladstone offers Mr. Campbell the "spe- cial thanks the book so well deserves." Then he goes on to discujs the subject-matter of the work thus :— The English race {I am a pure Scotchman) are a great fact in the world, and I believe will so continue but no race stands in greater need of discipline in every form, and, among other forms, that which is adminis- tered by criticism vigorously directed to canvassing their character and claims. Under such discipline I believe they are capable of a great elevation and of high performances, and I thank you partlv in anticipa- tion, partly from the experience alreadv had, for taking this work in hand, while I am aware that it is one collateral and incidental to your main purpose. Surely "dear old Scotland" will find delight in Mr. Gladstone's unequivocal phrase," I am a. pare Scotchman." though Walter Scott. had he been alive, would certainly have fallen foul of Mr. Gladstone for talking of" Scotchman." Mr. Glad- stone's letter continues Puritanism again,'is a great fact in history, exhibiting so many remarkable ana noble traits, it may. perhaps be liable to the suspicion of a want ef durability. During the last century it seems to have undergone in various quarters much disintegration, and it is difficult to connect it historically with the divorce law of Connecticut. But I am wandering into forbidden ground, which my qualifications do not entitle me to tread, and I will close with expressing my sense of the value and importance of a work like yours, and of the benefit which we. in particular ought to derive from it.-I remain, dear sir, your most faithful and obedient, W. E. GLADSTONE.

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CONGL Y CYMRY.

BARDDONIAETH.