Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

BARRY AND CADOXTON LOCAL BOARD.

THE CADOXTON AND BARRY GRAMMAR…

[No title]

BARRY W.D.) SCHOOL BOARD.I

QUOITS.

PENARTH POLICE COURT.

SEBIOUS CHARGE AGAINST A BARRY.…

[No title]

SERIOUS ASSAULT CASE AT CADOXTON.

News
Cite
Share

SERIOUS ASSAULT CASE AT CADOXTON. WOUNDING A NEGRO. At the Penarth Police-court, on Monday, before Mr. Gore (in the chair) and Mr. T. R. Thompson. Florence Fitzgerald, seaman, Cadoxton, was charged by Alexander Dowers, a coloured seamen, from the West Indies, with assault at Cadoxton. on the 27th inst. Prosecutor said he lodged at Thompson's Boarding-house, Courtenay- street, Cadoxton. He was in the kitchen last Saturday evening at five o'clock. The prisoner and several other men were there. He said nothing to the men except to ask for the loan of a pipe to smoke. The man lent it him, and prisoner said to him. You son of a bitch, why do you come among white men ?" Defendant struck him with his fist. He put defendant's head under his arm, and they both fell down. They both got up, and prosecutor ran into the front room. Prisoner followed him into the front room. and witness saw him pick up a jug. The jug was thrown at him and struck him on the head. He couldn't) say whothrew it.—Prosecutor, on examina- tion, admitted that he had told the police that the prisoner threw the jug at him, and on being cau- tioned by the magistrates,he now said prisoner threw it at him. He went out to look for a doctor, and he met a constable, who bound his head up and took him to a doctor. After he had been to the doctor, the mistress of the boarding-house came and took him back. No one had been talking to him about the case.—Cross-examined by the Bench, wit- ness said no one had talked to him about the ca.-c*. —Mrs. Martha Thompson, married woman, the boarding-house mistress, said she lived at 22. Courtenay-road. On Saturday evening, about five, she was upstairs in her bedroom. She heard something break, and came downstairs to see what was the matter, and she only saw the men going out. She went in the front room. and found the remains of the jug on the floor. There was some blood on the floor, which one of the men swept up. She went and fetched the prosecutor from the police-station. His head was bandaged up. She did not see any blood on his clothes. She had never seen the prisoner at her house before. Being a sailor, she could not help knowing a good many people at Cadoxton. Prosecutor's cousin worked for her house.—Dr. Livingstone said on Saturday, at 5.:10, he examined the prosecutor at his surgery. He found one large wound from the forehead to the eye, quite three inches in length, and the bone was exposed the whole length of the wound. He stitched it up, putting three or four stitches in it. The wound was bleeding very freely. The skin of the bone was injured. He found another wound over the right temple about an inch long. also to the bone. He put a stitch in that wound also. Prosecutor's clothes were covered with blood, and he must have lost quite a quantity of blood. Had he not received prompt medical assistance the bleeding would probably have endangered his life. He did not consider that the wounds would have been caused by the prosecutor falling en a jug. and they were the result of considerable violence. The two wounds might have been caused by the same jug.— Acting-sergeant Gammon, stationed at Cactoxtcn said he met the prosecutor on Weston Hill, Cadox- ton. with blood streaming down his face from a wound on his forehead, and there was a track of blood along the road where he had walked. He bandaged up his head with a handkerchief, and took him to a doctor, who dressed his wounds. From what he told him he arrested prisoner outside the Wenvoe Arms Hotel, at Cadoxton, about 0 p.m. He told prisoner he would have to come to the station with him for wounding a coloured man. He said "The only thing he can do is to summon me." He took him to the police- station. prosecutor was there at the time, and said That's the man who throw the jug at me." In the presence of Inspector Rees ho charged the prisoner with unlawfully wounding prosecutor in a board- ing-house about five that evening, by striking him on the head with a jug. He cautioned prisoner who said" We both had a fight, and I was not going to let a b—— blackman beat me. I caught hold of a jug from the table, and bashed him on the head." Prisoner then became very excited. Inspector Rees corroborated the last witness's statement, and said he heard the prisoner say, We both had a fight, and I was not going to let a h blackman beat me. I caught hold of a jug from the table, and bashed it at his head.—Defen- dant said the jug fell between the two of them, and the prosecutor was as much to blame as he was. -The Bench decided to send the prisoner to be tried by a jury at the Swansea Quarter Session to be held in September. Bail was allowed, prisoner in £ 50, and two sureties in the same amount.

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS AT BARRY…

IDiNAS POWIS FLOWER SHOW.

WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT,

Advertising

BURIAL OF PAUPERS AT PONTYPRIDD.