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WELSH CONGREGATIONALISM.

THE VACANT PROFESSORSHIP AT…

A TRIPLET OF GIRLS.

A TRAMP ACROSS WALES.

[No title]

MINERS' PROVIDENT FUND. --♦—

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IBRIDGEND NOTES.-.--

ITHE WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT…

BLAENGARW NOTES.

IISENSATIONAL AFFAIlt AT MAESTEG.…

BRIDGEND PETry SESSIONS. ..

NEW MASONIC HALL AT BRIDGEND.

ISOUTH WALES COAL TRADE. I.

THE SLIDING-SCALE ARRANGEMENT.

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THE SLIDING-SCALE ARRANGEMENT. VIEWS OF COUNCILLOR MORRIS. TO THE EDITOR. During the past few weeks the above question has been prominently before the public through the Press pnd on the platform. The con- troversy between the members of the Committee and the officials; of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain has been very interesting, and though it may be presumptuous on my part, yet as the question affects me personally much more than it affects some of the gentlemen who have taken part in the discussion, it may not be out of place to express my views. It shall be my en- deavour to treat the subject dispassionately with a view to arrive at a just conclusion. In the first place, it will be necessary to attempt to discuss whether a Sliding Scale arrangement for the regulation of wages, based upon the selling price of coal, is right in principle or not. Secondly, if wrong in principle, is it expedient to adopt such an arrangement under the present relative positions of capital and labour ? Thirdly, granting that it is expedient under present circumstances, is labour fairly and iustlr treated ith reference to the first question, my object will be to prove that the regulation of wages based upon the selling price of any commodity is wrong in principle. It is false political econoiuv, contrary to the cherished opinions of all Trades' tj nionists, opposed to the material success of all commercial enterprises carried on upon sound basis, and in its essence and effects detrimental to the best interests of labour. Its natnral results carried out to its finality, may be seen in the Sweat- ing System so extensively prevailing in the large towns, undermining the very foundations of man- hood and society, creating a class devoid of self- respect, self-reliance, and independence, and caus- ing immense loss to the real producers of the wealth of the country. It appears to me that the great point is, who is to decide the value of a. man's labour ? Is it the capitalist or the man himself ? Is the price of any commodity to be fixed according to the amount paid for its production, with fair interest upon the outlay, or must the labour given in its production depend upon the price which the capitalist thinks fit to charge for it ? I have no hesitation in say- ing that labour being a necessity and that capital can only mean accumulated labour, or rather the overplus of labour, it is the inherent right of the first instance of labour, viz., that of the workman himself, to fix the value to be put upon it. The question for every working man is, what is the real value of hit labour, and not what is its relative value. What is it worth, not what can the employer afford to pay in order to secure a good dividend. If I mistake not this is a rale adopted in all commercial enterprises. The builder, when he tenders, takes into consideration the price of materials and the standard wages he has to pay, and fixes the price accordingly. He never bases the wages of his man upon the amount of his contract. The seller of any commodity fixes the price. If the buyer finds the price too high he need not purchase. The working man. upon the same principle, has tha right to put a price upon his labour as much right as the colliery pro- pnetor to fix the price at which he will sell his coal and it is radically wrong to base the value of labour which is the capital of one man, upon the price at which another sells a commodity which is his capital. The law of supply and demand will certainly have great influence in fixing the vaiua- of a man's labour, but the fixed price has nothing to do with the principle who is to put that price. I feel suie that miue owners-would reseat, and justly so. any attempt on the- part of buyers t& form a fyndicatc to fix the price of coal iiidiroii, yet, virtually, the wages of the oolliers is fixed by a powerful syndicate comprised of capitalists. I maintain, therefore, that the value of labour should not be based upon the selling price of any commodity, but Uiat tiie real value should be- taken into consider ion in fixing the price. The great object of Trades Unionism is to secure the just recognition and the true value of labour By united and concerted action it has been the means to raise the working man from a position of dependence, and: even slavery, to that of inde- pendence and respect, with full power to sell his labour at its fair market valtMh In order to secure the full recognition of the rights of labour in South Wales -It- is essential that a thoroughly democratic organisation-be formed, embracing all workmen in and about the collieries, and until that is done no Sliding-scale, whether amended or not, or no Sliding-scale at all, will afford to the, working man'the position he ought to occupy, or give him the power to exercise his right' of utilising, his capital, that is his labour, to the best possible advantage. With your permission I shall discuss the other two questions ii. another M.ter -I am, &c RICHARD MORRIS. Pentre, July 25th, 1892.

LAHOCH WAR IN AMERICA,

THE CARDIFF BUILDING STRIKE.

COMMUNICATION WITH LIGHTHOUSES.

[No title]

A LIBERAL UNIONIST ON WALES.