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WELSH CONGREGATIONALISM.

THE VACANT PROFESSORSHIP AT…

A TRIPLET OF GIRLS.

A TRAMP ACROSS WALES.

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MINERS' PROVIDENT FUND. --♦—

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IBRIDGEND NOTES.-.--

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I BRIDGEND NOTES. The Bridgend Union bids fair to maintain the high character given to it by the Local Govern- ment Board Inspector. It will be seen that at the last meeting of the Board a report was presented showing a marked diminution in the expense of relief-indoor and outdoor—and this is a sure indi- cation that the decrease in pauperism in the district is still going on. Perhaps this result is due to some extent to the additional labour which the farmers require in the hay harvest. The recklessness of those employed in dangerous employments is a theme which has often" been commen ed upon, and a fact which has been often deplored. The risks to which men will sometimes needlessly expose themselves are not always narrated in the Press, but occasionally such events obtain publicity in the courts. At Bridgend last Saturday two colliers were mulcted in penalties of £ 3 and £2 respectively for reckless conduct in the lynewydd Colliery—details of which we report in another column. It is to be hoped that the fines inflicted in these cases will act as a salutary warn- ing to others similarly employed. The charge preferred against Mr. Edward Davies, of Maesteg, evoked much interest, and the state- ment by Mr. Scale that the accused had a complete answer to the charge will give great satisfaction to the many friends of Mr. Davies, who has alwavs been regarded as a man of honour. The magis- trates expressed their wish that the case should be decided by a jury. Evidence for the defence was not adduced, and as, therefore, only one side of the case has been stated, the further hearing at the assizes will be watched with interest. I The selection of Mr. Tom Richards, conductor of the Pontycymmer Glee Society, to act as con- ductor at the next Whit-Monday Musical Festival, I which will be held next year at Bridgend, has given much satisfaction in this district. Mr. Richards will be the first local man selected for that position. Preaching at Nolton Church last Sunday morn- ing the rector of Coity (Rev. F. W. Edmonds, M.A.) denounced the universal tendency to pro- crastinate in spiritual affairs, and asked what would be thought of a man who instead of at once deciding and dealing with matters of business put off and procrastinated waiting for a more convenient season which never arrived. It was easier for to come to God at once than to put off doing so until after years of habitual neglect of Him. The sermon was listened to with marked attention, and at the close a collection was made in aid of the sufferers by the great fire at New- foundland. The local Freemasons had an agreeable time on Monday upon the occasion of the opening of the new Masonic Hall, when there was a large atten- dance of members of the Lodge and their friends. The Salvation Army has been busy in the district around Bridgend this last week celebrating the 27th Anniversary of the foundation of the Army. We are glad to hear from the various district officers that the work of the Army has met with a large degree of sucaess, and that the ministers of other denominations have given them what assistance they could, an instance of the benefits of co operation on the part of the various denominations may oe seen at the united open-air services which are held on the Common at Aber- kenfig every Sunday. The temperance party in Bridgend held a meet- ing on Tuesday evening which was a great success. We are glad to observe that the local temperance workers have not fallen into the error which many temperance organisations do of going to sleep during the summer months, and only rousing to active work on the commencement of the winter. If any appreciable progress is to be attained in combating the drinking customs of the age, constant and systematic work should be carried on by all advocates of temperance throughout the year-in summer as well as winter. In the hot weather the temptations to drink is stronger hence the need for every encouragement being given by teetotallers to their weaker brethren. There was a large attendance of magistrates at the petty sessions court last Saturday, :nl as it happened there was plenty for them to do. It was a great convenience to those interested in the cases that the magistrates decided to form a second court as many were thereby releast d from attendance at the court at a much earlier hour thau would otherwise have been the case. One hears so much nowadays of the action of justices that when they do a good thing it is only right that due publicity should be given to the fact. Probably one of the hardest-worked magistrates in this district is Mr. Charles Price Davis and from the questions which he puts to thoze appear- ing before him, it is evident that he takes an in- telligent interest in all the cases which he has to decide, and does not by any means discharge his magisterial functions in the perfunctionary manner of some of his more easy-going colleagues on the bench. I

ITHE WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT…

BLAENGARW NOTES.

IISENSATIONAL AFFAIlt AT MAESTEG.…

BRIDGEND PETry SESSIONS. ..

NEW MASONIC HALL AT BRIDGEND.

ISOUTH WALES COAL TRADE. I.

THE SLIDING-SCALE ARRANGEMENT.

LAHOCH WAR IN AMERICA,

THE CARDIFF BUILDING STRIKE.

COMMUNICATION WITH LIGHTHOUSES.

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A LIBERAL UNIONIST ON WALES.