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THE COMING ELECTION IN SOUTH…

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THE COMING ELECTION IN SOUTH GLAMORGAN. [BY PELAGIUS.J. • — The great fight is drawing near, and though there is no doubt in anyone's mind of the return of Mr. Arthur Williams, there is some excitement felt in the result of the poll. Everyone in South Glamorgan i3 eager to know how much Mr. Williams's majority over Sir Morgan Morgan will exceed his previous majorities. Our esteemed correspondentil Pelagius"' writes as follows of the prospects of Liberalism in South Glamorgan :— In making a tour of the constituency with the object of gauging the result of the coming battle, I have tried to keep the following before my eyes —the combatants engaged, the credentials of the candidates, the alteration, if any. in the com- plexion of the constituency since the last election. the questions which are now before the country, and the attitude the rival candidates adopt towards those Questions. Your readers will all remember that at the General Election of 1885, which, for comparison, is the only one worth mention- ing. Mr. Williams was a comparative stranger. to° the bulk of the electors totally un- and known, as a member of Parliament untried, with the unenviable privilege of styling- himself a -barrister. And right well did the Tories make use of the argument that the House of Commons was already too full of lawyers. In vain did Mr. Williams, lime after time, insist that he did not practice his profession, neither did he intend to do so. None so deaf as those who will not hear. The Tory speakers would not hear, and hearing ■would not believe. On the other hand, the Tory wirepullers had brought out the strongest Con- servative candidate in the county. Mr. Llewellyn, now Sir John, was a man who had rendered good service in the councils of his county as Chairman of Quarter Sessions, Chairman of the Financial Com- mittee. and a member of every important com- mittee in the county, a man noted for his liberal-. -coming of good Liberal stock, and one who had taken a great interest in agricultural questions. It is no wonder that the majority of the farmers fought hard for him. while the fact that he came of a county family is suffi- cient explanation for the frantic efforts put forth by the clergy and county squires. But in spite of the screw, in defiance of the majority of the employers of South Glamorgan, the newly en- franchised electors with but a hazy knowledge of the working of the ballot returned Mr. Williams by a majority of nearly 600. At the coming election what do we find ? Mr. Williams a tried member, with an unblemished record. Go were I will, all reasonable men of every shade of politics have but one verdict, namely, he is a good mem- ber, always ready to bring a grievance before the proper authorities. Aye, even the majority of the farmers, in spite of themselves, are become sup- porters instead of opponents of our hon. member. Living in our midst, one farmer told me, he has proved himself our friend by taking an intelligent interest in all our schemes for improving agri- culture, and raising the status of the farmer. On the opposite side, who heads the forhorn hope—a Jubilee Knight. Of mushroom growth, living in a town, situate on one side of the constituency and a lawyer in practice, seeking to enter Parlia- ment where, according to our friends the Tories. there are already too many lawyers. The Tories often say that the Rads like a lord. Whatever truth there is in that, one thing is certain nothing i- -no dear to the hearts of the county squires and their wives and daughters as a county man. and if Sir Morgan thinks that they will welcome him to their jbosoms and work for him as they worked for the Squire of Penllegare. he must be of a sanguine temperament. Sir Morgan sometimes vaunts his knowledge of the Welsh language, and thinks to sail into St. Stephen on the deck of that frail barque. In his case it is a frail one, so frail that if the Dafydd Ap Gwilym Society make it com- pulsory that its members must pass an examina- tion in the Welsh language. Sir Morgan will remain outside its portals for ever. ¡; For one who is disowned and rejected in his native town, one who has lost the confidence of the working -men of Cardiff, to wish to misrepresent us is an insult to our intelligence." Thus spoke a sturdv working man to whom I put the question. What do you think of Sir Morgan's prospects ? In making a tour of the constituency nothing has so much impressed me as the quiet confidence of the Liberals, and the despondency of the Tories. The Liberals point with pride to the fight of 1885, while one old Tory fogy remarked that if Sir John had not gone roving about and remained true to his first love they would stand a chance, but now, said he, with sorrow in his voice, we will be shamefully 'beaten. From Penarth to the Ogmore division I found the same confidence. Loek at the County -Council elections," said a Penarth Liberal, "if you want to know if Penarth is Liberal. Barry Liberal, did you ask ? Why it is the stronghold of the division." ilNo, no," I replied, "there is Cymmer." "True," said my friend, "but we had Cymmer in 1885 and 1888, but now Barry is a second Gibraltar for ns." While on my tour through the Vale, I found everywhere the same enemies made friends men who worked against Mr. Williams in 1885 pledged 1;0 support him at the coming fight. Staunch Tories look askance at the candidature of the Jubilee Knight, while a great proportion of the Liberal Unionist friends laugh at the idea of a man calling himself a Liberal voting for Sir Morgan. Even in the little villages which are to be found between the Aber and Ogmore. I found a lot of sturdy Liberals in spite of the power of the Parson and local Squiredom. In the Kibbor division Liberalism is on the increase. In Landaff, villa dom will go Tory, but Cymmer will more than counterbalance it, while the popular Squire of Xanharran is a tower of strength to the Liberal party in that neighbourhood. As an example of the difficulty experienced in that district by the Liberal agents in 1885, it was with difficulty walls could be found to paste the Liberal posters, so afraid were the people to offend their landlords. But a change is come over the spirit of the dream. All is changed. Men are not afraid to speak and vote for the Liberal cause. Bridgend will vote straight. Local prejudices will be buried, and Liberalism will be triumphant. Sir Morgan boasts of being able to speak Welsh. Sir Morgan is not the first Welshman who, though able to prattle in their native tongue, betrayed their country but the veil is lifted, and the Jubilee Knight, who is opposed to Home Rule in Wales, who is a supporter of an alien Church, who is opposed to the rating of royalties, who is opposed to one man one vote, and who ridicules the idea of small allotments, will nevor be re- turned to St. Stephen's to misrepresent South Glamorgan; but South Glamorgan will return a man who is in sympathy with the aspirations of Wales, who is pledged to Land Reform, who is pledged to press the rating of royalties, and is in favour of granting to Irishmen, Welshmen, and Scotchmen the power to work out their own destinies—with a majority of over one thousand.

A SUMMER EVENING IDYLL.

BARRY ELECTORAL DISTRICT AND…

THE WHIT-MONDAYI EISTEDDFOD.

A FEW WORDS WITH TOM ELLIS.

I ICOLLISION AT BARRY DOCK.

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FROM WALES OVER THE SEA.I

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NANTYMOEL PARS.

OCCASIONAL NOTES FROM PORTHCAWL.

BRIDGEND SCHOOL BOARD.

LLANTWIT-YARDRE SCHOOL BOARD.

ORIGINAL POETB Y.\

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BRIDGEND POLICE COURT.

CANTATA PERFORMANCE AT BRIDGEND.

STRIKE OF COLLIERS IN THE…

MADAME WILLIAMS-PENN'S CONCERT.

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