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FOOTBALL XOTES.

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BARRY CADOXTON LOCAL BOARD.

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TWO REVIEWS OF THE 44 WELSH…

A CATHOLIC PAPER ANi) )iii…

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A CATHOLIC PAPER ANi) )iii THE SOUTH WALES STAR." The Catholic Ncicx in an appreciative article on a review that appeared some time ago in the South If ale# Star, on the "Early British Church," says -My readers know that a great effort is being made by lovers of the Established Church to strengthen its position against anticipated assaults in Parliament; and, among other things, to per- stiade the people of this country that the Estab- lishment is not, as had been supposed, the out- come of Henry's conscientious scruples and the fixed resolve of Elizabeth to be Queen of England but that it is in truth identical with that Church which was the glory of our country for nine centuries and more before the day when Gospel light shone out from Boleyn's eyes. I do not be- lieve that many votes will be influenced by this remarkable view, when the time comes for an election to tnrn on the question cf Disestabiish- men-t. Those who dislike the existing arrange- ment will be quite ready to overthrow it, whether it have lasted for three centuries only, or for thirteen. The time has passed when the antiquity of an institution, was deemed sufficient reason for preserving it. If Disestablishment is to bt averted, some better reason must be dis- covered than the fiction of Continuity. These remarks occurred to me on reading in the South Males Star' of% October 2nd, 1891, a review of the late F. Anderson's little book entitled "Britain's Earl Faith." (Burns aud Oates, 28, Orchard-street, London, W.) The reviewer ap- pears to be a Welsh Noncetiformist; and although he is as far as possible from being a Catholic, he finds much to agree with in- the book before him. I commend the following passage to the attention of my readers. I only wish the writer had in- dicated the basis on which- he would rest his sturdy Protestantism :— One thing Mr. Anderdon, in, our opinion, pretty conclusively proves. If you believa-in-Continuity afcaJi, you must believe in the authority of Rome. A Pro- testant Nonconformist or an Evangelical (Jhurcinn-an is not effected by the question. As John Milton said, The plain truth is that when ':Uty. cf our men that are wedded to antiquity come to dispute with a and, leaving the Scriptures, put themselves without appeal to the Synods and Council, using in the cause of Sion the hired soldiery of revolted IsrDel-wherc they [. give the Romanist one buff they receive-many counter buffs." It is easy to dispute several points which Catholic writers lay great stress on, t v/ tile Council of Niecsa: but if the Fathers are to be taken as unim- peachable authorities on early Christian practice and observance, it is hard to see how the supremacy of Rome can be disputed. One great man said soma years ago that there was no choice between Rome and infidelity. We cannot go as fj/r a.- that. lint, to our mihd,tfc*re seems to be no half-way house between the sturdy Protes- tantism which reduces theological truth to the standard of personal judgment" and Roman Cutholi- cism, supported by the authority of the Fathers and Ecclesiastical Councils. It remains to-be' sard that Mr. Anderdon's book is very readable, although it bristles with historical facta and theological subtleties. It is the work of an author of acute mind, great know- ledge, and wide research, and should be-read by who are interested in the early British Church.

KIND WORDS TO THE "STAR."

ORIGINAL POETRY. -

VOLUNTEER INTELLIGENCE,

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BRIDGEND LOCAL BOAUD.

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IMPORTANT WUICE.

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