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I JOTTINGS OX POLITICS.

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I JOTTINGS OX POLITICS. Too late too late Yon lingered on the roarl too long, You lingered at the gate. The successor of St. Augustine, his Grace of Canterbury, has visited Xorth Wales, and told the Rhyl Congress that Canterbury will not suffer its ecclesiastical province to be dismembered with impunity. Well would it have been for Wales and Canterbury if the successors of St. Augustine had paid the same attention to the religious interests of Wales that they have ever shown in asserting their metropolitan rights. Prtrcssc non prod!re (to boss it. not to serve us) was the policy of Canter- bury in the thirteenth century, as the Welsh princes complained to Rome. The very same com- plaint the Pontypridd conference made last month. In the thirteenth century the Archbishop of Can- terbury took action in Wales, riding over the country with Norman knights, and celebrating the Mass at the High Altars of our cathedrals to assert their supremacy. The work was done, the old Celtic Church abolished, the four Welsh bishoprics were reduced to the position of four dioceses of the See of Canterbury. The Primate came in 1284 to witness the extinction of our nationality, and then he let us alone—left the people to darkness and heathendom—left us alone for centuries. In the seventeenth century Wales, rightly or wrongly, fought the brittle of the Established Church. It was the passive resistance of Wales that paralysed the Puritanism of the Crom- wellian days. and put the Bishops and Archbishops of England back in the palaces from which their predecessors had been driven. But Canterbury had no gratitude. Englishmen were often ap- pointed to Welsh sees before the seventeenth century. From the seventeenth century to our own time they were always appointed. Canter- bury did nothing to aid our great religious revival, but over the drunken person and the absentee bishops it threw the shield of its protection. Canterbury has no future in Wales. Disestab- lishment will soon prove that the Welsh parson is now a Welshman. Almost in spite of himself he is growing a democrat. After disestablishment those who pay the piper will call the tune. The connection between the Episcopal Church and Canterbury will be purely nominal whether it will be even nominal depends a good deal on the behaviour of Canterbury. One thing at least is certain the Welsh Episcopal Church v will require a head. It will require a national synod or convocation. It will not take long even to convince the honest Ritualist that an Archbishop of St. Davi'ds and a National Con- vocation will not be too dearly bought at the expense of the tithe rent charge. Canterbury, let Welsh Churchmen remember, is not fighting for them. The successor of St. Au- gustin. as such, can have little love for the descend- ants of the British bishops who rejected the founder of his see so what the Archbishop wants in Wales is supremacy, a supremacy that has been a curse to the Welsh people, and a even greater curse to the Welsh Church. The Welsh Methodist of the future may say. I was born free but it will be a prouder boast for a future Archbishop of a free Welsh Episcopal Church, a successor of whom Giraldus would have been proud, to say, !1 With a great price obtained I this freedom." ALIQUIUS.

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