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THE FRENCH BANK-NOTE FORGERIES.…

CAROLINE GRAVIERE.

A LEECH BAROMETER.

[No title]

rHE CONVICT OUTBREAK AT IS…

THE THIRLMERE WATER SCHEME.

A RIVAL TO POET CLOSE.

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THE FENIAN PRISONERS.

THE SWITZERS AND SPRING.

CHEAPSIDE IN THE OLDEN TIME.

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THE PROPOSED AGRICULTURAL…

EMBALMING.

THE YANKEE PRIVATEER.

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RUNNING THE BLOCKADE AT CRETE.

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THE COST OF WAR. -

CHANGES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN…

[No title]

CANADA.

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CANADA. The Duke of Manchester presided over a meeting of the Royal Colonial Institute, held at the Pall- mall Restaurant, when a paper entitled Canada and its vast undeveloped interior," by Mr. Sandford Fleming, was read by Mr. Frederick Young, the hon. secretary of the Institute, in the absence of the author, who had been summoned by the Domi- nion Government to return to Canada immediately. Canada, it was said, covered fully more of the earth's surface than the comprised arens of Eucoj ean Russia, Lapland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Hoi land, Belgium, the British Islands, France, Spain, Germany, Austria, and all the principalities between the Adriatic and Black Seas-in fact, leaving out Soain and Italy, Canada appeared to equal in area the remainder of Europe. It has been round convenient in describing the general characteristics of Canada to divide it into three great regions—the mountain region, on the western fide, the prairie region, in the middle; and the woodland regien, embracing the settled provinces on the St. Lawrence. Professor Macoun estimated that there were no less than 160.000,000 acres of land available in the prairie region alone for farming and grazing purposes, of which one-half might be considered fit for cultiva- tion. Its mineral riches were but imperfectly known, but it had been established that immense deposits of coal existed in many parts; and besides coal and iron ore, petroleum, salt, and gold had also been found. The prairie reeion was alone ten times the area of England, reckoning every description of land. Referring to the mountain region, he said the Cascade Chain rose abruptly from the sea level; the average height of the many serrated summits would probably range from 5000ft. to 8000ft. above the sea level. The main Rocky Mountain Chain was in Canada from 300 to 400 miles distant from the Pacific Coast. Off the shore of the mainland there wtre several large islands, the most important of which wasvanoouver Island the others were the Queen Charlotte group and along the shore of the mainland there existed an archipelago of smaller islands. The mountain region had some good lands, but the fertile tracts were limited in extent. It was exceedingly rich in minerals. Coal and iron were found in profusion, and the precious metals were also found. Proceeding to describe the woodland region, he said it was of immerse exfant. Although elevated ranges, like the Laurentides, .vere met, only a small proportion of the country exceeded 2000ft. above sea level. An area of fully 200,000 square miles was estimated to be under 500ft. The forests which covered the surface would every year become more and more valuable; and the more important minerals were geld, silver, iron, copper, lead, phos- phates, and plumbago. The writer ttcn drew attention to the gradations of climate in Canada. Taking all its natural elements of future wealth and greatness into consideration, the problem which presented itself was the development of a country which had been provided with natural resources so lavishly. The question was how to colonise the northern half of North America and render it the home of a happy and vigorous people. Canada had a population of 4,000,000, but as yet thomereouterfringeofthecountry was occupied. It was just beginning to dawn upon Canadians themselves that in the territories described there was room and to spare, and there existed the elements of support for a greater population than the mother country. It was not until railways were introduced that the progress of the provinces was so marked, and the great interior to be prosperous, if colonised at all, must eventually be traversed not simply by one railway, but by many railways. The great waterways would de their part during the open season in assisting to colonise the vast unoccupied regions that were fitted for the homes of men. but they alone would be utterly insufficient. The pacïBo Railway had been projected for the double purpose Of connecting the Atlantic and Pacific sides of Canada and the opening up of the interior for settlement. In the present condition of the country its censtruc tion was a very serious undertaking and required grave consideration. Considerable progress had already been made, and he had no doubt whatever that it would at no distant day be a work aC' complished, that it would form not only a connecting link between the old half-dozen provinces on the A^ lantic and the still greater number of provinces which had yet to come into existence in the west, but that i* would constitute an important part of a great imperial highway extending between the heart ef the Empire England and some of its outlying portions and depeft' dencies on and beyond the Pacific. In conclusion the author said that Canadians gloried in their connec tion with the little island across the water. Th could not be called Englishmen, but they were to be British subjects, and were by no means unWilliøl to join in the trials and struggles of the mother country.

PENNY BANKS.

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