Welsh Newspapers

Search 15 million Welsh newspaper articles

Hide Articles List

19 articles on this Page

AUSTRALIAN NEWS.

OUR INDIAN ARMY.

News
Cite
Share

OUR INDIAN ARMY. According to the last returns, our Indian army matter* aomething over 200,000 men, Europeans and natives. Of British troops there are 61,500. The Europeans oomprise fifty battalions of the line, nine regimenta ef cavalry and eighty-six batteries of artillery, and are stationed in the proportion of 10,000 in each of the Presidencies of Bombay and Madras, while Bengal absorbs the remainder. The native regiments master 120,000 of all ranks, and may be roughly divided into 20,000 cavalry and 100,000 infantry. There is very little native artillery, the authorities in India deeming it wise to retain that arm in the hands of British soldiers. A few mountain batteries are to be found on the Punjaub frontier, ofieered by the Royal Artillery, and manned by native gunners, but this force is too insignificant to be takøn into consideration. The native infantry and cavalry are otfieered in the same way as our British troops, the officers in command of companies and troops being also natives. The squadron com- manders in the cavalry, and the half-battalion com- manders in the infantry, as also the colonel and adjutant are, however, British officers belonging to the Staff Oorpa, seven being attached to each regiment or battalion. The cavalry, for the most part at any rate, is irregular cavalry, and resembles a good deal that of the Osssacks, since every man rides his own horse and enjoys more independence than a trooper in a line regiment; The Madras Light Cavalry is the only ex- eeption to this rule, for in this can the Indian Go- vernment mounts the men, this section, which may be termed regular cavalry, numbering about 2400 sabres. The infantry is modelled on our own line regiments. There are eight companies in every battalion, num- bering from 700 to 800 men, and they are drilled and disciplined in accordance with instructions framed at the Horse Guards at home, te which all are amenable through the Commander-in-Chief in India. In fact, to all intents and purposes, the native Indian army is under the control of the Field Marshal Commanding- in-Ohief, as are the Colonial forces. There is in India, it seems, no lack of recruits. and the number of native troops could it any mcment be very consider- ably augmented without much trouble to recruiting officers.

[No title]

THE CASE OF THE REV. MR. DODWELL…

THE NEPTUNE.

[No title]

DOTHEGIRLS' HALL:

CAVALRY ORGANISATION.

[No title]

THE CLEOPATRA VERDICT.

SALE OF THE NOVAR COLLECTION.

[No title]

MADAME TEIAL AND

ah fv, a FL°or)S IN LONDON.

[No title]

OUR MILITARY POSITION. ■

[No title]

CIGAR ENDS.

[No title]